Idaho Lawmakers Seek to Bar Premarital Sex on TV During Specified Hours


Boise, Idaho – Lawmakers in Idaho have overwhelmingly approved a proposal to request that the federal government and the FCC ban premarital sex on television during specified hours.

The House State Affairs Committee has had enough of sitcoms, dramas and even advertisements being sexual in nature and wants to do something about it.

“We need to take a stand and stand up for for the morality of what is best for the citizens of Idaho,” stated Representative Darrell Bolz.

The Committee would like to see a ban on all depictions of premarital sex, as well as inferences to the act, between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m.

The proposal is not a bill, nor any act that will change what takes place on the airwaves in the state, but is rather what is known as a “joint memorial,” which is defined as a measure “adopted by both houses and used to make a request of or to express an opinion to Congress, the President of the United States or both.” In other words, legislators will send a statement or opinion to the government, urging it to take action on a certain matter.

While some applaud the move and agree that it is an issue of national importance, others state that restricting sex on television interferes with individual rights.

“I think its infringement on freedom of speech, don’t want the government telling me what I can or cannot watch,” Viola Hauck of Boise told television station KBOI.

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The FCC, which regulates television and radio broadcasting, among other matters, has addressed decency in the media in recent years. As previously reported, the government entity was required by the Supreme Court to clarify its broadcast rules last Summer to clarify its prohibition on “momentary nudity” and “fleeting expletives.”

The decision released by the court regarded three broadcasts on the Fox and ABC Networks, which the FCC had found to be in violation of government regulations. During the Golden Globe Awards in 2002 and 2003, singer Cher blurted out profanity and actress Nicole Richie used two expletives on stage, which were not silenced by the networks. Additionally, during an episode of NYPD Blue, a scene showed a woman’s bare buttocks for seven seconds.

The FCC had leveled heavy fines against the networks for the incidents, which the court struck down, as it said that FCC rules were not clear as to what constituted a violation of the law.

Current broadcast regulations do not ban premarital sex on television, nor the discussion of or promotion of illicit sexual behavior.


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