Dutch Man With Depression, Alcoholism Dies by Assisted Suicide

Photo Credit: Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

NETHERLANDS — A Dutch man who struggled with depression and became addicted to alcohol in trying to deal with the condition has died by assisted suicide.

Mark Langedijk, 41, received a lethal injection at his parents’ house this past summer, as recently recounted by his brother in the publication Linda.

“My brother suffered from depression and anxiety and tried to ‘cure’ it with alcohol. He’s from a normal family, he did not want this to happen. He did not take an easy way out. Just a humane one,” Marcel Langedijk wrote. “Alcoholism and depression are illnesses, just like cancer. People who suffer from it need a humane way out.”

He said that he and Mark had a happy childhood, but eight years ago, he learned that that his brother had an alcohol addiction. Langedijk sought help, ending up in the hospital and in rehab 21 times.

“Psychologists, psychiatrists, GPs and other health care professionals did their best to help him,” he outlined, “but Mark could not explain to anyone what he felt.”

Langedijk’s marriage also struggled during his battle with depression and alcoholism.

“My parents especially have done everything humanly possible to save Mark,” his brother said. “They adopted his two children, they took him in when his marriage finally collapsed, they helped him find accommodation, they arranged rehab, they gave him money, support and unconditional love.”

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But feeling unable to overcome his problems, Langedijk decided to die and scheduled a date to end his life. His brother described his diary as a “hopeless cocktail of pain, drink, loneliness and sorrow.”

This past July, a doctor arrived at his parents’ home and administered three lethal injections after confirming that he was absolutely sure he didn’t want to live anymore. His last day was spent drinking, smoking, laughing with his family and eating meatballs.

“Mark’s eyes turned away, he sighed deeply–his last,” Langedijk’s brother recalled. “Dr. Marijke injected the third syringe. His face changed, lost color. My little brother was dead.”

But some have stated that Langedijk’s death is another example of the slippery slope in allowing assisted suicide.

“What someone suffering from alcoholism needs is support and treatment to get better from their addiction, which can be provided—not to be euthanized,” British MP Fiona Bruce, who also serves as co-chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Pro-Life Group, told the Daily Mail. “It is once again a troubling sign of how legalized euthanasia undermines in other countries the treatment and help the most vulnerable should receive.”

As previously reported, a Canadian man with mental illness and suffers from psychosomatic pain is currently seeking the right to die as treatment thus far has been unsuccessful.

“Non-existence is better than this,” Adam Maier-Clayton, 27 and an atheist, told CBC News last month. “The real reason for someone like me wanting the right to die is simple: Once there’s no quality of life, life is akin to a meaningless existence.”


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  • Amos Moses

    /SMH ……….

  • Amos Moses

    “Non-existence is better than this,” Adam Maier-Clayton, 27 and an atheist, told CBC News last month. “The real reason for someone like me wanting the right to die is simple: Once there’s no quality of life, life is akin to a meaningless existence.”

    well that just about sums the A-theist position up …… and it is so completely wrong ………. no such thing as “Non-existence” ………

    • james blue

      Most Atheist I have encountered in discussion say as they only get one life they hold it as precious and not to be wasted.

      • Amos Moses

        K …

    • hytre64✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

      Non-existence is not an option. You have one life to live, and after that comes Judgement.

      I understand that depression can be an illness which warps your thinking – but there is ONE who can help you if you turn to Him. I believe that even if depression winds up killing you – if you have put your faith in Him, He can have compassion and mercy on you.

  • Guest254

    There is a clear explanation on how suicide is defined. The act or one takes ones own life. “Assisted” I wonder what else they are going to come up with.

  • Nidalap

    It started out with terminal illnesses. Now, depression and alcoholism.
    Next?

    • james blue

      Do you believe in the right to self determination?

      Hypothetical- Had this guy let everyone know he wanted to end it all and wrote in his suicide note not to revive him then took an overdose, attempted to hang himself or some other method, but didn’t immediately die, should people around him try to revive him?

      • Guest254

        Now this question just man’s thought against any reasonings whether they be Christians that believe in Jesus or Humane. This society has come to what you feel is right at the moment. When an outbreak of this happens then you’ll want to reverse the order of it.

        • james blue

          I don’t believe others should live their lives to satisfy my sensibilities.

          • Guest254

            But we live in a country filled with laws that govern sensibilities.

          • james blue

            How are your rights lost by this guy deciding to end it all?

            My rights end where yours begin and your rights end where mine begin.

      • Nidalap

        Of course they should.
        How many folks have attempted suicide and were later thankful to have failed?
        Mentally ill people do not make good decisions by definition.

        • james blue

          I may need clarification about what you are specifically responding to on that as it was a two-parter, so please accept advanced apologies if I appear to misinterpret it as only answering the hypothetical.

          So you don’t believe in the right to self determination? Should it be illegal for a patient in hospital to have a “do not revive” order?

          Are your views based on satisfying your own sensibilities?

          I think suicide is a tragic waste of life. I’ve see so many who wish to live desperately try to cling on against the odds due to illness and accident only to lose that battle yet here we have people who could go on choosing not to. In an Ideal world we would be able to transplant the “brain” of a person who wants to live into the body of someone who doesn’t, but that not the case. Yet with all this in mind, capital punishment cases aside, I still hold that the only person who should have a say in whether you or I live or die other than by natural causes is us alone or someone we have specifically given our wishes to in case we cannot.

  • Grace Kim Kwon

    Dutch churches and Dutch hospitals and Dutch prisons should have Bibles everywhere. This is so sad. Reading some British literature such as “A Dog of Flanders” would even cure depression… I hope Dutch schools are teaching their children on the Dutch Resistance. True heroic Earthlings. That’s how a man should live. When a man has the truth and a clear purpose of life and has to work for bread, he does not get depression. Even if he does, he overcomes. Nations shouldn’t grant people’s suicidal wish. Without Christianity, education is meaningless in rich nations. People commit suicide in a paradise.

    • WorldGoneCrazy

      They probably no longer teach about Corrie ten Boom there. 🙁

      • Grace Kim Kwon

        Right. It’s so sad after surviving the hellish Nazi Germany’s terror. I wonder what went wrong with all the Western European nations and all the former British colonies towards the end of last century. They have been the finest nations to live on earth – the true earthly utopia which any Earthlings would risk life just to reach – with the most excellent Protestant legacy. A good life? Humanism? Immorality? Godless education? It just doesn’t make sense.

  • bowie1

    There are probably thousands who treat depression with alcohol and yet they do not commit suicide. Being an atheist he believed death would end his misery and yet we believe part of you lives on in another form either in heaven or hell so if the latter is now his destiny then his struggles are not over. But I will not judge since he may have called out to God silently before he passed on.

  • Kevin Quillen

    so apparently there is no “hippocratic oath” there. The doctor committed murder.

    • Nidalap

      Yep. They’re trying to do away with that.
      The whole “Do no harm” thing really gets in the way of them “doing what’s best for the society”…

  • stars misplaced

    good for mr. langedjik. there is no reason to stay here if you do not want to. double bonus for throwing yourself a bon voyage party, including your loved ones in your decision and for not making a mess.

    “Tell him,’ the colonel said, smiling, ‘that a person doesn’t die when he should but when he can.”

    ― Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude

  • Mr Cleats

    I’m not sure I understand progressives. They try to make Christians feel guilty because they say we are driving homosexuals to commit suicide. And yet they applaud assisted suicide?

    So, it’s a horror when homosexuals commit suicide, but if anyone else commits suicide, we should help them do it. That doesn’t really sound like “equality,” it sounds like homosexuals’ lives are more valuable than anyone else’s.

    • craig4

      Where did it mention homosexuals?

  • craig4

    I don’t understand why anyone cares if someone desires to have assisted suicide. It saves society money, saves you paying for their long term care (which most conservatives don’t wamt to do). I’ve had close friends commit suicide and it has to be done under horrible conditions and is going to happen anyway, so making it as comfortable as possible and discussed beforehand is much better than someone just doing it. If you believe the Bible that’s fine; you will be fine. And it is fine if you care someone commits suicide. If you believe non-existence doesn’t exist that has no effect on another person, or you. I do not think allowing it is a slippery slope to anything, and you can voice your opposition to it.

    • Ken Faivor

      Suicide is a sin, as only a man deep in hopeless despair attempt it. The Lord came to save us from the sin of despair through the knowledge of His Word. To despair is to turn your back on His saving grace.

      The one verse that should help anyone in despair is this one.

      1Co 10:13 There hath no temptation taken you but such as man can bear: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation make also the way of escape, that ye may be able to endure it.

      That is a promise.

      • Saunders61

        So, if god made this guy with the genetic predisposition toward depression and/or alcoholism, and god could heal the guy, but didn’t….your god is a sadist.

        • Ken Faivor

          Sin is what caused the problem. If he inherited it from his father or his father’s father, then all the more the need for a savior.
          Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law, all the way back to Adam. Bad genes are not the problem……..unbelief in the cure is the problem.

  • Rick

    A life without Christ does seem hopeless. I have never understood the draw to atheism…..it is ultimately a meaningless life philosophy. The instant gratification needed to sustain hope runs out very quickly. Write a book, make a movie, compose music….it all eventually becomes irrelevant and society moves on. Your memory becomes an afterthought. Your great, great, great grandchild won’t even know you hardly existed beyond the pictures.
    All that matters is loving God and loving others in His name. That remains. That has purpose.