Report: China Ends Forced Abortion Policy Due to International Outcry

A Massachusetts pro-life organization that is dedicated to “revealing the injustice of China’s one-child policy” says that it has received confirmation that the country has stopped enforcing its forced abortion policy.

All Girls Allowed, directed by Brian Lee, outlined that it contacted officials in the Chinese city of Chongquing this week to inquire about reports that enforcement of the long-established policy has been halted. The organization was told that an order had been issued from the Chinese government on August 30th, instructing officials to no longer force women to be sterilized or obtain late-term abortions.

“Earlier, the government issued a document to all the family planning committees. Everyone has received it,” the unidentified committee member stated. “We will not use forced abortion.”

The decision to end the practice follows public outcry stemming from photographs that circulated in June of a woman named Feng Jiamei, who was forced to obtain an abortion after failing to pay a $6,000 down payment against a fine for becoming pregnant a second time. The photographs showed Jiamei lying in a hospital bed with a bloodied infant at her side.

According to reports, officials inked Jianmei’s thumb and forced it against an “abortion consent” form after she was taken into custody. The baby was then injected with fatal toxins.

“I could feel the baby jumping around inside me all the time, but then she went still,” Jianmei told a friend. “The baby was lifeless, and she was all purple and blue.”

In China, when a woman marries, she is subjected to regular physical checkups, while the government keeps a very detailed record of her personal status. She must also obtain a permission card before she gets pregnant, or she still may be forced to abort her first child. The birth of a second child is prohibited altogether due to concerns with overpopulation.

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Because of increased international attention to China’s one-child policy and its practice of forced abortion, the country has felt much pressure in recent months to cease its actions, which many condemned as being tyrannical. At a national Population and Family Planning Commission meeting in July, Minister Wang Xia urged law enforcement to “absolutely stop performing late-stage abortions.”

The following month, the decree was issued that none should force a woman to obtain an abortion.

“The media’s exposure of this injustice has been invaluable, and people in China and around the world are standing boldly against injustice. This has made China understand that they can no longer hide the brutal truth. Minster Wang Xia’s order to end forced abortion is awesome progress,” remarked All Girls United founder Chai Ling.

However, Ling noted that families may still be punished for having more than one child.

“Even with Minister Wang’s call to end late-term forced abortions, the policy remains coercive: it still threatens parents with huge fines and job loss for having a second child,” she said. “Human rights will take a back seat as long as the government continues to use family planning fees as a major revenue source. China cannot genuinely claim that the policy is ‘coercion-free’ until it no longer threatens parents’ livelihoods and ability to provide.”

The order issued by the Chines government also does not outlaw abortion altogether, but rather prohibits law enforcement officials from killing a woman’s pre-born child against her will.


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