Atheist Military Organization Asks Pentagon to Court Martial Superiors Who Share Faith With Troops


Albuquerque, New Mexico – An atheist organization that seeks freedom from religion in the military is asking officials at the Pentagon to court martial any Armed Forces superior who “promote[s] their personal religious beliefs to their subordinates” or “extend[s] preferential treatment for any religion.”

The Military Religious Freedom Foundation, led by Mikey Weinstein, recently told reporter Todd Starnes that he wants to end proselytization on military bases, and compared evangelistic activity to rape.

“Someone needs to be punished for this,” he said. “Until the Air Force or Army or Navy or Marine Corps punishes a member of the military for unconstitutional religious proselytizing and oppression, we will never have the ability to stop this horrible, horrendous, dehumanizing behavior.”

“It is a version of being spiritually raped and you are being spiritually raped by fundamentalist Christian religious predators,” Weinstein asserted. “As soon as we find a fundamentalist Muslim, atheist, Jewish person or anybody else, we will be happy to fight them, but so far they have been few and far between.”

Starnes reports that Weinstein met with Pentagon officials on April 23rd in an effort to urge them to enforce current laws, which require military superiors to “balance constitutional protections for an individual’s free exercise of religion or other personal beliefs and the constitutional prohibition against governmental establishment of religion.”

“If a member of the military is proselytizing in a manner that violates the law, well then of course they can be prosecuted,” he stated. “We would love to see hundreds of prosecutions to stop this outrage of fundamentalist religious persecution.”

Weinstein said that to promote one’s religion in the Armed Forces is “sedition” and “treason” and should be stopped.

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The Pentagon confirmed that proselytization is not permitted on military bases.

“Religious proselytization is not permitted within the Department of Defense,” spokesperson Nate Christensen stated. “Court martials and non-judicial punishments are decided on a case-by-case basis and it would be inappropriate to speculate on the outcome in specific cases.”

While punishments may vary, those who are court martialed can either face jail time or, at worst, be dishonorably discharged.

In response to Weinstein, Family Research Council has launched a petition drive to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel to urge him to protect the free exercise of religion.

“Reports indicate that senior Pentagon officials have recently consulted with radical secularists to formulate a policy that would put military chaplains and other leaders who ‘promote their personal religious beliefs to their subordinates or to extend preferential treatment for any religion’ in danger of court-martial,” the petition states. “Subverting the religious freedom of our troops both hurts the morale of our troops and puts our nation at risk by labeling courageous military personnel as enemies.”

“I urge you to resist the demands of anti-Christian activists who are calling for a court-martial order upon chaplains and service members who share their faith,” it continues. “If Christian chaplains and other troops are censored from offering the full solace of the Gospel, there is no religious freedom in the military.”

As of press time, over 67,000 signatures have been received.

“The very troops who defend our religious freedom are at risk of having their own taken away,” the Washington-based organization lamented. “If this policy goes forward, Christians within the military who speak of their faith could now be prosecuted as enemies of the state. … Our brave troops deserve better.”

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7 Responses to Atheist Military Organization Asks Pentagon to Court Martial Superiors Who Share Faith With Troops

  1. The First Amendment does not provide freedom OF religion, it provides freedom FROM religion. That means, we are protected against people preaching to us on a governmental level, and the military counts as just that.
    This is the best news I have ever heard.

  2. A-theism is by definition not a religion, it is a lack of belief. For gods sake read a book. why should the minority be protected from the will of the majority? Its called a constitutional republic. Again read a book.

  3. Mark Wettengel

    I find it hard to believe in someone who makes a contridiction in what he says. Weinstein states that Christianity is oppression.Yet The Christian Bible quotes in Acts 10:38 “How God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power, who went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed of the devil for God was with Him.” How can a follower of Christ who wants to help people that are oppressed cause oppression? is it not a contridiction? How can a follower of Christ who wants to help people by doing good, be said of him that he is causing horrible,horrendous,dehumanizing behavior? Christianity is based upon Love, not trying to imprison or kill your fellow man. Could it be that what some view as good is no longer good but evil wanting to get rid of good? I find nothing wrong with someone of sound mind as our military Chaplains are, to be available to those in the armed forces that are going through situations in their lives to come to those chaplains for help. Notice these folks come to them of there free will, not coaxed or suduced as some suggest. We must examine the fruit, the outcome. If there is a positive outcome to the persons life after visiting with the chaplain what is wrong with that? Does Weinstein want the opposite? I see this as a hate crime against Christianity not the other way around. One man should not have the power to dictate the lives of millions of people! We each have a free will. Therefore, it should be each one’s choice if they want to go to the chaplain or not. But it is not Weinstein’s right to interfere with the free will of another.

  4. Christ said “You will be hated for my namesake, but he that endureth to the end shall be saved.” It seems so called Christians had rather complain than accept this charge.

    • BP somehow I don’t think this situation is exactly what Jesus meant when He said that. Let me remind you that a dishonorable discharge can be very damning in the sense that it follows you like a felony charge does. You will ALWAYS have to disclose that on any application, be it for a job or financial aid and so on. It’s more than just a piece of paper.

  5. I as a Christian, can see where it would be a problem if in any job that someone of a higher position forced those under them to go to a certain religous ceramony or to believe in a particular belief system. However there are many benifits to belief in a higher power or a spiritual belief this would apply to all people. Freedom to assemble, freedom of speech and seperation of church and state seems to apply here.
    Has anyone asked our service men and women how they feel? It is disturbing that lgbt folks can share openly, Muslim and Islam believers can be granted exceptions to standard milatary gear based on religion and people can refuse to go into combat based on conscious objection. If those who go into combat pray to a higher power or pray for their soldiers more power to them.

    Another question is where is this coming from because as far as I am aware this has not been a problem with our troops.

  6. If this is true. Then I should be wanted for treason on several accounts. I never forced the Gospel on anyone, but I have told others the Good News of Jesus and the freedom of His Grace. Never forced but through a loving tone. If the testimony of True Love is outlawed then so be it. I will stand trial if it need to come to it. I am not ashamed of my Jesus who has set me free! :)

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