Rand Paul: First Amendment Says Keep Govt Out of Religion, Not Religion Out of Govt

PaulWASHINGTON — During a private prayer breakfast for pastors on Thursday, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) told those gathered that the Constitution never meant that God must be removed from government, but that the government was not to interfere with the practice of religion.

“The First Amendment says keep government out of religion. It doesn’t say keep religion out of government,” Paul told the approximately 50 persons gathered at the Capitol Hill Club in Washington D.C.. “So, you do have a role and a place here.”

“I open the Senate each Wednesday morning, and we open it every day with a prayer,” he noted. “You have prayer in government. Religion is part of our daily life and a part of our government; it always has been.”

According to CBN News, which recorded Paul’s comments during the breakfast, the event had been organized to present his views on faith, religious freedom and the role the Church plays in the government.

During his talk, the Kentucky Senator told pastors not to look to Washington to solve all of the nation’s problems, but that change needs to happen from a grassroots gospel effort.

“The moral crisis we have in our country—there is a role in trying to figure out things like marriage,” Paul said. “There’s also a moral crisis that allows people to think that there would be some sort of other marriage. So really there’s a role outside and inside government.”

“I think the exhortation to change people’s thoughts has to come from the countryside—from everywhere outside of Washington,” he continued. “We’re the most disconnected city on the planet from the people, so don’t have a lot of faith in what’s going on up here.”

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Paul then reiterated statements he has made in the past, remarking that a spiritual awakening is needed in America.

“I’ve said this before: We need a revival in the country,” Paul added Thursday. “We need another Great Awakening with tent revivals of thousands of people saying, ‘Reform, or see what’s going to happen if we don’t reform.’”

As previously reported, throughout America’s early history, a number of the Founding Fathers issued proclamations calling inhabitants to prayer, including in 1798, when President John Adams proclaimed a national day of humiliation, prayer and fasting.

“As the safety and prosperity of nations ultimately and essentially depend on the protection and blessing of Almighty God, and the national acknowledgment of this truth is not only an indispensable duty which the people owe to Him,” he wrote, “…this duty, at all times incumbent, is so especially in seasons of difficulty and of danger, when existing or threatening calamities—the just judgments of God against prevalent iniquity—are a loud call to repentance and reformation.”

“[L]et us not forget the religious character of our origin,” American statesman Daniel Webster also declared during his famous “Plymouth Oration” in 1820, less than 50 years after the nation’s founding. “Our fathers were brought hither for their high veneration for the Christian religion. They journeyed by its light and labored in its hope. They sought to incorporate its principles with the elements of society, and to diffuse its influence through all their institutions, civil, political or literary.”

“Let us cherish these sentiments,” he continued, “and extend this influence still more widely, in the full conviction that [it] is the happiest society which partakes in the highest degree of the mild and peaceful spirit of Christianity.”

Video: CBN News/The Brody File


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  • Richard

    The USA became the most sought after place to live – and most powerful nation – because of God’s protection, provision, and guidance. How foolish it is to exchange that for what man thinks he can do by himself.

    You’d think we’d learn that from Israel – when they trusted God, they prospered. When they didn’t, they suffered.

    God doesn’t change, but man repeatedly demonstrates how foolish man is.

    • Richard

      AMEN! !

    • Paul Hiett

      Funny me, I thought it was the blood, sweat, and tears of people of all walks of life, of all cultures, and all faiths…that is was their sacrifice that made this country what it is.

      How silly of me to assume that only Christians built this country.

      • The Last Trump

        No, it was the dedication of the United States of America to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. The same God George Washington prayed to for help to defeat the British. The same God countless presidents of those United States directed the populace to pray to and did so themselves. The same God who’s Word presidents and judges swore oaths over before taking office. The same God who was worshipped in churches on every street corner in every town, village and city across the entire nation. The same God the nation gathered in churches and school auditoriums to pray to for victory on the eve of the invasion of Normandy in WW2. That God.

        Oh, what? You thought WE were responsible for America’s greatness and blessings?! Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! Oh, man you really are foolish, aren’t you! But don’t feel bad about being wrong, (again) Paul. Seems to happen to you a lot around here, huh? We’re here to help brother.
        Stick around. You might learn something.

        • Paul Hiett

          So your deity stormed the beaches of Normandy, eh?

          Better not tell that to the atheists, and Hindu’s, and Sikhs, and gays, and Jews, and Muslims and every one else not Christian who gave their lives for this country.

          • Richard

            You might want to study WWII so you can see the many miracles that happened to allow the allies to win.

          • Paul Hiett

            That’s funny. Sad, but also funny.

            And here I thought it was the men that fought the war that helped us to win.

          • Richard

            Sure, men and women fought. But the allies received God’s assistance in key situations. You might want to read about the days of prayer and what that produced.

          • The Last Trump

            You mean the atheists, Hindu’s, Sikhs, gays, Jews, and Muslims who fled the poor and oppressive, starving, war torn and depraved non-Christian countries they came from in droves to get to a country that was as close to paradise on Earth as could possibly be found?

            Don’t need to tell them anything. They were smart enough to know to head for a country that dedicated itself to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. A country that flourished with protection and blessings that made them the envy of the world. They sure as hell weren’t dumb enough to go to OTHER Muslim and atheistic countries were they? Gee, I wonder why…

            How we doing now, smart guy? Let’s just see how America fares now that God has been “forced” from her lands. Let’s just see if her blessings can be accounted for by her immoral, bankrupt, drug/alcohol/sex addicted citizenry, as YOU would have us believe. Not doing so hot so far, pal.

            The United States of America has become the laughing stock of the world – a bad joke. Her fall is widely observed and remarked on across the world. The only idiots who haven’t realized it yet are the fools continually fighting for sexual promiscuity and immorality above all else. While their country burns and slips into the abyss. Nice to have such responsible priorities. Fools.

            Enjoy your Godless America, Paul.
            You earned it, buddy

      • Marty

        Silly, funny or just trying to win an argument by twisting around words. He said “because of God’s protection, provision, and guidance”, not Christians.

      • Richard

        It was silly of you. But you’re forgiven.

      • Cecil PelhamSr

        Well Paul after studying HISTORY, I have found as I have always KNOWN. that it was FREEDOM of religion upon which this country was founded…. And I can assure you….that as I speak, there is still BLOOD, SWEAT and TEARS being put forth for this GREAT NATION…the BLOOD comes fro the many MILITARY service personal, both men and women who have gave their lives for your FREEDOM, the SWEAT is from the hard work which ALL have to do to make a successful life . and last but certainly not least the TEARS come from the Parents, Wives and Children who have lost a loved one fighting for your FREEDOM …And YES! they gave their all ,so that you and I could have that RELIGIOUS FREEDOM.. So maybe now you can understand. that it was and still is RELIGIOUS FREEDOM that this COUNTRY is built on…. “God” BLESS you as you enjoy this freedom.

      • LIFE – A Gift Divine

        I have a question you can research Paul. How many Presidents believed in God since the first president? Once you see the answer you will understand how Christians built this country.

      • LIFE – A Gift Divine

        Paul, I’m asking you to consider where you are in life. Turning to Christ doesn’t mean you give up your freedoms. It enhances them spiritually, and physically. You and your daughter will be loved by Christians like me. We are far more accepting than you realize. If there were any way to convince you of that it would be with kindness and love. I know your strong in your atheist concepts. But your going to see big changes and I would not want to see you turn your head against God. There is so much peace and joy coming your way. I genuinely pray for you and your daughter every day. It would be a difficult road, there is nothing easy about being a Christian, but that’s all the more reason to consider it. Nothing great has ever come without sacrifice, but the gold is in reach. Like a an individual in the Olympics. They work hard, they give up much, and when they get the gold and hear the national anthem play, it’s not about the gold, its about the journey they took to be the best.

      • jjhot254 .

        do you troll every christian sites or just this one?

  • Crono478

    ““The First Amendment says keep government out of religion. It doesn’t say keep religion out of government,”

    That is absolute correct. That is what First Amendment is really intended for. The origin of “separation between church and State” is from the third President Thomas Jefferson’s letter to Danbury Baptist Association in the State of Connecticut on January 1, 1802.

    “Gentlemen,

    The affectionate sentiments of esteem and approbation which you are so good as to express towards me, on behalf of the Danbury Baptist Association, give me the highest satisfaction. My duties dictate a faithful and zealous pursuit of the interests of my constituents, and in proportion as they are persuaded of my fidelity to those duties, the discharge of them becomes more and more pleasing.

    Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between man and his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legislative powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should “make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof,” thus building a wall of separation between church and State. Adhering to this expression of the supreme will of the nation in behalf of the rights of conscience, I shall see with sincere satisfaction the progress of those sentiments which tend to restore to man all his natural rights, convinced he has no natural right in opposition to his social duties.

    I reciprocate your kind prayers for the protection and blessing of the common Father and Creator of man, and tender you for yourselves and your religious association, assurances of my high respect and esteem.

    Thomas Jefferson
    President of the United States”

    Thomas Jefferson actually supported First Amendment and likened it to “wall of separation between church and State”. It means that any state or federal government can’t… impose religion on anyone. Jefferson wrote about the nation’s will is to be based on rights of conscience. In other words, people have to exercise their religion in Government including passing laws. Government just cannot declare or impose any religion on anyone.

    Later on, “separation of church and state” has been completely taken out of context and is turned into “Freedom from Religion” and “banning freedom of religion in schools, public places and government”.

  • flunkdaddy

    Progressives hate God, worship of the State is what they demand!

    • Paul Hiett

      Hard to hate what doesn’t exist.

      • The Last Trump

        That settles it, then. God exists.
        Cause there’s a whole lotta folks filled with hate around here, eh Paully?

        • Paul Hiett

          You don’t see atheists telling people they’re going to hell because of whom they love.

          So yeah, you’re right about that.

          • Richard

            If you don’t believe in God, isn’t it silly to view hell as being a bad thing?

          • Paul Hiett

            It’s the intent behind it, Richard. Christians don’t say it to others as a term of endearment.

          • Richard

            Heaven is where God is. Since you don’t want to be with God, you should be fine spending eternity in a different place. Why view that as being a threat? Wouldn’t that amount to being your paradise…doing whatever it is you want to do?

          • Paul Hiett

            Do you think gays and atheists like being told that we’re going to hell and that we’re damned?

          • Richard

            Did you not read my comment? If you prefer to not be with God, why perceive hell to be damned? Wouldn’t that be your paradise…spending eternity doing whatever you want?

          • Paul Hiett

            I did, now please answer my question.

          • Richard

            How can I answer your question when you haven’t told me why you think hell will be bad place?

          • Paul Hiett

            You can answer the question just fine if you had the intellectual honesty to do so. It’s a pretty simple question.

          • Richard

            Intellectually honest? Are you joking? Do you even know what that means? Are you suggesting you know what I’m thinking?

          • Paul Hiett

            Simply answer the question then. All it takes is a “yes” or “no”.

          • Richard

            If you noticed, I asked you the first three questions. When you answer them I’ll answer yours.

          • WorldGoneCrazy

            He is not going to answer, Richard, because you have him on the ropes, intellectually speaking.

          • Richard

            Thanks, WGC. You did too. Good answers!

            I’ve noticed Paul obfuscates, deflects, becomes irrational, or disappears when confronted with questions impossible to answer from an atheistic perspective. That should be telling him something…I hope and pray.

          • WorldGoneCrazy

            Indeed. And I might add that you are doing a very nice job of incorporating the Gospel into your apologetics approach – it is nice to watch a skilled surgeon at work!

          • Joshua Tree

            Is that what they’re calling “microaggressions” ?

      • Marty

        Yes it is, yet here you are, day after day, hating. Is really all that you have to do, heckle people on a Christian discussion forum? Life is too short to hate. Let it go.

        • Paul Hiett

          Have any children who are gay? Family members? I’m guessing not.

          I’m guessing you’ve never watched people…professed “Christians”…tell someone you love that they’re going to hell because they’re gay.

          You’re right, maybe you people should just let it go, and start treating others with a little kindness and respect and stop pretending you give a crap about their “souls”. Your choice of a religion is not theirs, nor mine, and you have no right to force anyone to live based on your choice of a religion.

          Perhaps you should try looking at it from a different perspective?

          • WorldGoneCrazy

            “I’m guessing you’ve never watched people…professed “Christians”…tell someone you love that they’re going to hell because they’re gay.”

            Under a-theism, there is absolutely nothing wrong with what they are saying. It’s just survival of the fittest in your world, Paul. Again, if you are going to make an objective moral claim (even one I agree with, I might add), then you are pointing to an objective Moral God. Thank you for acknowledging Him. No Golden Rule in a-theism. Have you never seen a lion take out a gazelle?!?

      • Richard

        You admitted that you can’t prove God doesn’t exist. Are you saying you found a way to do that?

        • Paul Hiett

          No more than you can prove Odin doesn’t exist.

          • Richard

            I’ll take that to mean you still can’t. Based on that, why lie about God’s existence?

          • Paul Hiett

            And since you can’t prove Odin doesn’t exist, I’ll take that to mean you still can’t. Based on that, why like about Odin’s existence?

          • Richard

            All you have is avoidance. Isn’t that telling you something about your beliefs?

          • Paul Hiett

            No more than what it says about your beliefs. You believe all deities exist, you just continued to follow in your parents footsteps of Christianity.

          • Richard

            Are you saying I’m Christian because of where I live?

          • Paul Hiett

            Bingo.

          • Richard

            Then why aren’t you Christian?

          • Paul Hiett

            I was allowed, at the age of 15, to stop going to church and to search for myself. I began to read about other religions. When I joined the military and was shipped off to the Middle East, I learned a lot more about religion, and the dedication that each side of that conflict professes towards their beliefs.

            After the military, part of my college “career” included many classes regarding religion.

            Finally, the internet has a been a huge boon in terms of learning of the many religions in our world, both past and present. You should try learning about other religions.

            There are plenty of graphs available to see why religion is just a geographical accident. Here’s one…

            http://www.worldreligions.psu.edu/images/artimages/maps/worldmapsmall.jpg

            There’s a reason this graph looks this way…

          • Richard

            Your reply negated your assertion. It’s really not about location, but about a decision.

          • Paul Hiett

            How many people, in the entire world mind you, live in a family that would allow them to choose their own path?

          • Richard

            Most Christian families.

          • Paul Hiett

            *spits coffee*

            ROFL…oh man you are funny!!!

          • Richard

            Wasn’t meant to be funny. My parents never forced me. They let me decide. As I do with my children.

          • Paul Hiett

            Of course they did. You were raised a Christian, and then you “decided”.

            Ok.

          • MisterPine

            Almost as good as Oboehner saying he was “born with his beliefs”.

          • WorldGoneCrazy

            Your geographical argument commits the well-known genetic fallacy. Better brush up on your reading and investigate some brilliant old a-theists, instead of the blind faith New A-theists.

    • Richard

      It’s more like the worship of self…similar to why satan fell.

  • Richard

    The allies won the Second World War because of God’s assistance. Keep in mind that their opponents were praying to their gods for help too. Yet, the one true God demonstrated His power once again by bringing victory to those who trust in Him.

    History doesn’t have to repeat itself again and again on this point. Stand fast for God, and He’ll stand fast for you!

    • Paul Hiett

      Not only is that sad, but it’s also insulting to the millions of people who served this country, and the millions around the world who gave their lives in defense of freedom…and not all were Christian.

      • Richard

        Have you read the D-day prayer? The majority of fighters trusted in God and would probably find your comments insulting.

        • Paul Hiett

          No, they wouldn’t, because they knew that religion didn’t make any difference when the bombs started falling. They relied on each other, not God.

          • Richard

            You really should study up on what you criticize.

          • Paul Hiett

            I would say it safe to say I have forgotten more about WW2 than you’ll ever know.

            Try sitting down with a few veterans and see why they fought. I’ve had the privilege to sit down with men like James Magellas and Chester Nez, among others, and listened to them. I’ve been to France and Germany, I’ve had the honor to meet veterans from the resistance, and from the Wehrmacht.

            You have no clue what you’re talking about. To a man, they all fought for their brothers next to them.

            It’s an absolute insult for you to suggest what you said. Try repeating that to such a veteran and see what response you get back.

          • Richard

            You presume too much. I have many friends who served and still do. They find comfort knowing God is with them.

            You’re trying to make an issue where there isn’t one. Another sign of desperation. Try reading the D-day prayer. You’ll find the truth is not your fabricated version.

          • Paul Hiett

            My “truth” is merely a reiteration of what the men who actually did the fighting have said.

            Don’t take my word for it, go ask them.

          • Richard

            I told you I know many. They disagree with your fabrication.

          • Paul Hiett

            No, they don’t. They may find “comfort” in their belief of God, as you say, but they don’t fight for God.

            http://usmilitary.about.com/cs/army/a/soldiersfight.htm

            The team asked the soldiers the same question Stouffer asked soldiers
            in his 1949 study — “Generally, in your combat experience, what was
            most important to you in making you want to keep going and do as well as
            you did.”

            American soldiers in Iraq responded similarly to their
            ancestors about wanting to return home, but the most frequent response
            given for combat motivation was “fighting for my buddies,” Wong’s report
            said.”

            Nothing you say will change the truth of this.

            http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4671512

            HANSEN: What about other wars of the 19th and 20th century.
            Are there times when soldiers seem to be fighting for something
            other than what their leadership said they were fighting for?
            Prof. McPHERSON: Well, I think that once soldiers are in
            the Army and are facing combat, there’s another kind of motive that
            becomes added onto whatever ideological or patriotic motives
            brought them into the Army in the first place, and that is
            indicated by second word in the title of my book, `Comrades.'”

            You are 100% incorrect about what you have claimed, which makes me believe you lied.

          • Richard

            “but they don’t fight for God.”

            I never said they fight for God, but with Him. Christians trust in His help.

            http://docs.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/odddayp.html

          • Paul Hiett

            “The allies won the Second World War because of God’s assistance.”

            This is why you lost the argument.

          • Richard

            > This is why you lost the argument.

            No. The allies won because of God’s assistance. They prayed on D Day, and D Day turned the tables. That’s just one example.

          • Paul Hiett

            You’re certainly entitled to your opinion. I wouldn’t go around telling anyone that though…especially not anyone who was actually there.

          • Richard

            As I’ve said three times now, I have many family members and friends who were veterans. They disagree with you.

          • Paul Hiett

            No, they don’t, because that’s not what they said. No one, except you, believes what you’re claiming. No one fought for God and no one thinks God won the war.

            In fact, if you even stop to think for just a moment, you’d see how ridiculous your statement is. If you actually think “God” affected the war, then that means that God is having a direct influence in the affairs of men. One step further here, and you see that God COULD stop the suffering, but CHOOSES not to.

            Some God.

          • WorldGoneCrazy

            “One step further here, and you see that God COULD stop the suffering, but CHOOSES not to.

            Some God.”

            Whoops, there you go again, Paul, sitting in God’s lap in order to slap His face! You know full well that, under-a-theism, you cannot assert objective moral values and duties without stealing from an objective moral Law Giver. And, every time you do that, you are acknowledging His existence by stealing from Him. I am glad you are acknowledging His existence, however unintentionally, but please do thank Him!

          • Paul Hiett

            Sure…you go right on thinking that.

          • WorldGoneCrazy

            Thank you, I will. And, just so you know, it is what the majority of heavy-hitting a-theists believe. Here is just one example, amongst many, that I can give you:

            “In a universe of blind physical forces and genetic replication, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won’t find any rhyme or reason in it, or any justice. The universe that we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil and no good, nothing but blind, pitiless indifference… DNA neither knows nor cares. DNA just is. And we dance to its music. “(Richard Dawkins, River Out of Eden: A Darwinian View of Life (1995))

            BTW, thank you VERY much for your service to our country or the allies, and may God continue to bless you, Paul.

          • Richard

            WorldGoneCrazy’s comments show that you haven’t thought about that and that you don’t know what your beliefs are constructed on, which is a common characteristic for atheists.

            If you think through your beliefs, you’ll find that his comments are bang on.

          • Richard

            > No, they don’t, because that’s not what they said.

            Atheists often die on the sword of presumption…as your comments clearly do.

            To base your entire system of beliefs on unfounded assertions and presumptions, rather than facts and evidence, is the plight of an atheist.

            This also clearly shows how desperate they really are to support a belief based purely on blind faith.

      • WorldGoneCrazy

        But, Paul, under a-theism, it makes no sense whatsoever to give one’s life for one’s country. There is no higher objective purpose under that view. For a-theists, it is necessarily foolish to die for others, because once one dies, that is the end of his existence, under a-theism. And, I have had many tell me just that. If a hand grenade were thrown into a room, even one filled with relatives, many a-theists have said they would be the first ones out the door. I believe that, in saying so, they were being perfectly consistent with their a-theism. There are no objective moral values or duties, if there is no God. God bless you, Paul.

    • Eric Jackson

      So would you say that there are bad Christians and there are good Christians?

  • Richard

    Paul, that conflict you are feeling on the inside is God knocking at your door and you trying not to answer. As much as you are trying to suppress the sound of Him knocking, He won’t go away no matter how much you try to suppress it.

    God loves you and wants you to come home to Him. He’ll pursue you until the final moment. If you really want to get your proof, all you need to do is, with a sincere heart, open the door and let Him in. He’ll do the rest.

    But He’s not going to force you. He leaves that decision to each of us.

    • Paul Hiett

      What conflict are you referring to?

      • Richard

        The one you keep trying to deny.

        • Paul Hiett

          Again, what conflict?

          • Richard

            Have you ever wondered why you spend so much time here?

            Isn’t it illogical to spend so much time trying to defend a belief you can’t and fighting against something you say you don’t believe in? Do you spend this much time in discussions about Odin? Zeus? The Easter bunny? Flying teapots?

          • Paul Hiett

            What does it matter how I spend some of my free time? Are you jealous?

          • Richard

            Not of you. But once again you don’t provide an answer. Just another desperate attempt to suppress God’s knocking.

          • Paul Hiett

            Neither do you.

          • Richard

            I always do when I have the information required to do so. You are very short on providing that information. That is telling.

          • Paul Hiett

            You never answer questions, Richard. Ever.

          • WorldGoneCrazy

            It’s a fair question to you, Paul: since, under a-theism, life has no objective meaning or purpose, what ARE you doing here so much?!? When I was an a-theist, I was not hanging around trying to convince theists that they were wrong: I was out having a good time and living the high life because I just KNEW that once I died, that was the end of my existence. Your mere presence on this site is self-refuting your a-theism, Paul!

            Unless you really are a seeker.

          • Richard

            I always answer a question when I have sufficient information to do so. This requires you to first answer the questions I posed to you?

            Atheists often use obfuscation and deflection when they find themselves facing a difficult question to answer. Your comments are replete with obfuscation and deflection. This also should be telling you something.

          • The Last Trump

            He does, actually.
            I know. Sad, right?
            Poor bugger.

          • MisterPine

            Personally I turn up here daily to see what gems I can contribute from Christian supremacists and bigots to the website fstdt.com (Fundies Say the Darnedest Things). Fun people like Oboehner who thinks man walked the earth with dinosaurs 6000 years ago, that evolution (or “evolutionism” as he insists on calling it) is a “religion,” that Catholics are not Christians, and that vaccines don’t work.

    • MisterPine

      Is it really your place to tell people what they are feeling inside? Should you not ask them rather than tell them?

      • Richard

        Some behaviours clearly display the inner conflicts.

        • MisterPine

          Maybe that sort of diagnosis should be left up to the mental health professionals who have actually met people in person and not amateurs on a message forum.

          • Richard

            Mental health professionals don’t have to meet in person to interpret behaviors and their causes. Some things are obvious.

          • MisterPine

            Do you think any qualified medical professional would make a diagnosis that a person did not have enough Jesus in their life, or that they should acknowledge God knocking?

  • Bill

    actually it does if the government cannot interfere with religion then religion cannot interfere with the government, it’s only fair.

  • http://www.bibleversusconstitution.org/ Ted R. Weiland

    Rand Paul: “American statesman Daniel Webster also declared during his famous “Plymouth Oration” in 1820, less than 50 years after the nation’s founding. “Our fathers were brought hither for their high veneration for the Christian religion. They journeyed by its light and labored in its hope. They sought to incorporate its principles with the elements of society, and to diffuse its influence through all their institutions, civil, political or literary.”

    This is true regarding the 17th-century Colonials who established governments of, by, and for God based upon His immutable moral law. This came to an abrupt end when the late 18th-century founders replaced those governments with their own humanistic government of, by, and for the people based upon Enlightenment and Masonic concepts.

    For more regarding these two antipodal governments, see blog article “375 Years Later: Constitution vs. Constitution” at http://www.constitutionmythbusters.org/375-years-later-constitution-vs-constitution/.

  • http://www.bibleversusconstitution.org/ Ted R. Weiland

    “…Although the First Amendment does not allow for establishing one religion over another, by eliminating Christianity as the federal government’s religion of choice (achieved by Article 6’s interdiction against Christian test oaths), Amendment 1 authorized equality for all non-Christian and even antichristian religions. When
    the Constitution failed to recognize Christian monotheism, it allowed Amendment 1 to fill the void by authorizing pagan polytheism.

    “Amendment 1 did exactly what the framers proclaimed it could not do: it prohibited the exercise of monotheistic Christianity (except within the confines of its church buildings) and established polytheism in its place. This explains the government’s double standard regarding Christian and non-Christian religions. For example, court participants entering the United States District Court of Appeals for the Middle District of Alabama must walk by a statue of Themis, the Greek goddess of justice. And yet, on November 18, 2002, this very court ruled that Judge Roy Moore’s Ten Commandments Monument violated the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause. Despite many Christians’ protests against this hypocrisy, it was in keeping with the inevitable repercussions of the First Amendment.

    “…Christians hang their religious hat on Amendment 1, as if some great moral
    principle is carved therein. They have gotten so caught up in the battle over the misuse of the Establishment Clause – the freedom from religion – that they have overlooked the ungodliness intrinsic in the Free Exercise Clause – the freedom of religion….”

    For more, see online Chapter 11 “Amendment 1: Government-Sanctioned Polytheism” of “Bible Law vs. the United States Constitution: The Christian Perspective” at http://www.bibleversusconstitution.org/BlvcOnline/biblelaw-constitutionalism-pt11.html.

    Then find out how much you REALLY know about the Constitution as compared to the Bible. Take our 10-question Constitution Survey in the right-hand sidebar and receive a complimentary copy of a book that EXAMINES the Constitution by the Bible.

  • LIFE – A Gift Divine

    Rand Paul has it exceptionally right. His position concerning religion and government is the intent of our constitution and he is a representative that see’s the world through clear eyes. His father was very much the same way and I have the utmost respect for them. If Rand Paul runs for President, being an independent, he will get my vote. I encourage all Christians to consider him if he does run. I think he is strong, passionate about his work, and has a father that in my opinion would have run the country much better than Obama ever could. Thank you Mr. Paul for standing up for our freedom of religion!!!

  • LIFE – A Gift Divine

    A recent article that supports Rand Paul’s message. And I like his message!

    Despite record declines in religious affiliation, more Americans pray than 30 years ago. Why? Researchers say those who pray find prayer brings spiritual meaning and understanding.

    Despite record declines in religious affiliation, more Americans pray than 30 years ago. Why? Researchers say those who pray find prayer brings spiritual meaning and understanding.
    By the Monitor’s Editorial Board March 7, 2015

    As they have for decades, tens of thousands of Christians around the globe and of different denominations gathered March 6 for the annual, ecumenical “World Day of Prayer.” The event, which this year focused on the meaning of Jesus washing his disciples’ feet, drew little media attention. But so, too, do many other aspects of prayer.

    Take this little-noticed trend in the United States: Even though church attendance and religious affiliation have reached record lows, the percentage of people who pray at least once a day has actually gone up – from 54 to 57 percent – over the past three decades, according to the 2014 General Social Survey, which is funded mainly by the National Science Foundation. About 3 out of 4 Americans pray at least once a week.

    “The stability of prayer contrasts sharply with erosion on other measures of religious commitment,” commented the Washington Post in reporting the survey’s results. Even among young people, or the Millennials who have been far less church-oriented than their parents were at the same age, praying remains almost as frequent in their lives as older people.

    Another 2014 survey, done by the Christian group Lifeway Research, found about two-thirds of Americans say they pray at least once a month. More than a third of those who pray say they pray for their enemies or those who have mistreated them.
    Photos of the Day Photos of the weekend

    One researcher of prayer, Elizabeth Drescher at Santa Clara University, finds that among those who cite no religious affiliation, prayer is “the only traditional religious practice that continues to be seen as spiritually meaningful.”

    “Facebook pages focusing on prayer are among the most popular and engaging on the platform, and prayer activity is a robust substratum of activity on Twitter across religious traditions and ideologies,” she writes. “Likewise, hundreds of smartphone and tablet computer apps have been developed in the past five years to support the prayer practices of believers, seekers, and skeptics alike.”

    While many Christians pray to get something in their lives, Max Lucado, author of a new book “Before Amen: The Power of a Simple Prayer,” explains that the purpose of prayer is to ask God to do what is right, with humility and trust.

    “God hears our prayers and the power of prayer doesn’t depend upon the one who prays, but upon the One who hears the prayer,” he tells the magazine Christianity Today.

    A famous Anglican theologian, N. T Wright, explains that Jesus’s direction for prayer, as found in the Lord’s Prayer, is designed “to align oneself with his kingdom movement and to seek God’s power in furthering its ultimate fulfillment.”

    “The Lord’s Prayer is the means by which the church celebrates what has been accomplished already in Christ and strains forward for what lies ahead,” he writes.

    Christians and others who pray may not yet be following what the apostle Paul sought: to pray without ceasing and to be constant in one’s prayers. But the constancy and unceasing number of people in the US who do pray provides some evidence of the power of prayer in daily lives.

    Whether done in secret or in public, such as at a “prayer day,” prayer still commands the attention of the faithful, if not the media.