School District to Remove Ten Commandments Monument in Settlement With Atheist Group

NEW KENSINGTON, Pa. — A Pennsylvania school district has agreed to remove a Ten Commandments monument on its grounds as part of a settlement with a prominent professing atheist organization that had sued over the Decalogue on behalf of a local teenager and her mother.

“In order to take the high road, as they say, we compromised and agreed to remove the monument,” New Kensington-Arnold School District Superintendent John Pallone told TribLive.

The district’s insurance company will also pay $163,500 in legal fees, which includes over $40,000 payable to the Wisconsin-based Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF).

As previously reported, in 2012, FFRF filed a lawsuit against the display on behalf of local resident Marie Schaub and her daughter, who complained that they were disturbed by the monument’s presence.

But in July 2015, U.S. District Judge Terrence McVerry ruled that the girl and her mother “failed to establish that they were forced to come into ‘direct, regular, and unwelcome contact’ with the Ten Commandments monument…”

McVerry outlined in his ruling that Schaub had only seen the monument two or three times. Her daughter—whose name has not been released—also testified that she didn’t pay much attention to the display while on campus. The girl also no longer attended Valley High School.

Therefore, McVerry declared that Schaub and her daughter had no standing in the lawsuit and dismissed the case. He said that the need for a lawsuit “seems to have manifested itself only after FFRF became involved in this dispute…”

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FFRF consequently appealed the ruling to the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, contending that the student indeed had “direct contact” with the monument. It claimed that the girl experienced harm because her mother enrolled her in a different school district so she wouldn’t have to pass by the Ten Commandments display.

In August 2016, the Third Circuit overturned McVerry’s ruling, opining that Schaub did have a case as removing her daughter from the school to avoid seeing the commandments constituted injury.

While the district ultimately decided to enter into a settlement, Superintendent Pallone expressed disapproval of how FFRF went about the matter.

“It’s an unfortunate circumstance that these opportunists forced the district into a situation where we had to make this decision,” he said. “These plaintiffs and their lawyers basically made a mockery of the judicial system.”

Pallone said that most don’t notice the monument, and note that he never realized it was there when he attended the school years ago.

FFRF says that it is pleased that the display will be removed.

“The First Commandment alone is reason why public schools may not endorse the Commandments,” Co-President Annie Laurie Gaylor said in a statement. “Students in our public schools are free to have any god they like, as many gods as they like—or none at all! In America, we live under the First Amendment, not the First Commandment.”

The monument will be moved to another location, as several private property owners have expressed interest in displaying the Decalogue on their land.

“It will likely be more prominent,” Pallone stated.


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  • Chris Clayton

    The courts supported the student. Perhaps it is time for the Superintendent to step down given his rather rude comments.

  • Vince

    They have this weird idea that the Constitution guarantees the right of atheists not to be offended.

    There’s a statue of Moses, holding the Ten Commandments, in the SCOTUS building in DC. Why don’t they go after that? That’s one of the most public buildings in America.

    • FHRITP

      They are, thankfully. They successfully had the one at the Oklahoma Capitol building removed, and are working on the ones at SCOTUS, and in front of the Texas capitol.

    • james blue

      So you’d be okay with the satanic goatman on display outside a school?

      The SCOTUS building has depictions of many “lawgivers”.

      • Vince

        There is no satanic goatman in the SCOTUS building.

        You shouldn’t drink so early in the day. Leads to serious problems in the elderly.

        • james blue

          Where did I say there was? Perhaps you should attend more classes

          • Vince

            Go back to your porn, leave the big issues to the adults.

          • james blue

            Gosh, you must be the captain of your kindergarten debate team.

            Still, I’ve been waiting for your grumpy gnome self to show up.

      • PlanetoftheAtheists

        That would ROCK!

    • Ambulance Chaser

      If it doesn’t, why did the school agree to move it?

      • Vince

        Buzz off.

        • johndoe

          You first

        • Ambulance Chaser

          That’s not an answer. Care to try again?

    • Guzzman

      Yes, Moses is in fact depicted atop the Supreme Court Building, along with numerous other historical law givers, including Muhammad holding the Quran. So by your logic, I guess the Quran is the basis for our U.S. system of law.

      • Vince

        So, you think Moses and Muhammad were “secular”? I have a hunch they would not agree.

        You people really are brain-dead. You admit that Moses is in the SCOTUS building, holding the tablets with the Ten Commandments, yet you claim the Commandments in another location are wrong.

        Must be Alzheimer’s.

        • Guzzman

          The depiction atop the Supreme Court Building has an overall secular purpose – to survey the dozens of famous lawgivers throughout history. Some of those lawgivers happened to be religious figures. So what? Some happened to be military figures, some happened to be scholars, and some philosophers. The constitutional issue is whether the depiction endorses a specific religious belief – it does not. It is inclusive of many different historical and legal perspectives.

          The 10 Commandments, as a stand-alone display on government property has typically been determined by the courts to convey a specific religious message. Government can not lawfully endorse a specific religious message.

          • Vince

            The statue of Moses is not “atop” the SCOTUS building.

            You’re not very bright.

          • Guzzman

            I never referred to a “statue of Moses.” Atop the exterior walls of the Supreme Court Building are friezes depicting exemplars of numerous lawgivers. A frieze is a broad, horizontal band of sculptural decoration, on a wall, usually near the top of a building. Those were the depictions I was referring to, and those depictions are of many types of historical lawgivers, some who happened to also be religious figures.

          • Boko999

            Projection!!! Spoor of the Trumpeteor Spawn

    • PlanetoftheAtheists

      Offended is one thing, a religion getting it’s message across to a captive audience of children using government resources is another. You got your churches, living rooms and pretty much anywhere in the nation to indoctrinate each other, just keep your hands off our tax dollars, its bad enough your churches don’t pay any

      • Royce E. Van Blaricome

        Offended is one thing, your religion getting it’s message across to a captive audience of children using government resources is another. You got your schools, living rooms and pretty much anywhere in the nation to indoctrinate each other, just keep your hands off our tax dollars, its bad enough you use our institutions and our taxes to pay for your religion and indoctrination.

    • Trilemma

      There are no words engraved on the tablets Moses is holding. Perhaps if the school didn’t engrave any words on their monument nobody would complain.

      • Vince

        The Bible makes it very clear that the tablets contained the Ten Commandments.

        What you atheists know about Christianity would fit on a Post-It note.

        • Trilemma

          Most Christians are not familiar with the Ten Commandments that were written on the stone tablets. Here are the Ten Commandments that were written on the stone tablets. Sound familiar?
          11 Obey what I command you today. I will drive out before you the Amorites, Canaanites, Hittites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites. 12 Be careful not to make a treaty with those who live in the land where you are going, or they will be a snare among you. 13 Break down their altars, smash their sacred stones and cut down their Asherah poles.[a] 14 Do not worship any other god, for the LORD, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God.
          15 “Be careful not to make a treaty with those who live in the land; for when they prostitute themselves to their gods and sacrifice to them, they will invite you and you will eat their sacrifices. 16 And when you choose some of their daughters as wives for your sons and those daughters prostitute themselves to their gods, they will lead your sons to do the same.
          17 “Do not make any idols.
          18 “Celebrate the Festival of Unleavened Bread. For seven days eat bread made without yeast, as I commanded you. Do this at the appointed time in the month of Aviv, for in that month you came out of Egypt.
          19 “The first offspring of every womb belongs to me, including all the firstborn males of your livestock, whether from herd or flock. 20 Redeem the firstborn donkey with a lamb, but if you do not redeem it, break its neck. Redeem all your firstborn sons.
          “No one is to appear before me empty-handed.
          21 “Six days you shall labor, but on the seventh day you shall rest; even during the plowing season and harvest you must rest.
          22 “Celebrate the Festival of Weeks with the firstfruits of the wheat harvest, and the Festival of Ingathering at the turn of the year.[b] 23 Three times a year all your men are to appear before the Sovereign LORD, the God of Israel. 24 I will drive out nations before you and enlarge your territory, and no one will covet your land when you go up three times each year to appear before the LORD your God.
          25 “Do not offer the blood of a sacrifice to me along with anything containing yeast, and do not let any of the sacrifice from the Passover Festival remain until morning.
          26 “Bring the best of the firstfruits of your soil to the house of the LORD your God.
          “Do not cook a young goat in its mother’s milk.”
          27 Then the LORD said to Moses, “Write down these words, for in accordance with these words I have made a covenant with you and with Israel.” 28 Moses was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights without eating bread or drinking water. And he wrote on the tablets the words of the covenant—the Ten Commandments. – Exodus 34:11-28 NIV

  • Jason Todd

    Meanwhile Islam is being taught in public schools and the FFRF is silent. Big shock.

    • Tangent002

      If Islam is being taught about, it is in the context of a Human Geography or other Social Studies course.

      • Jason Todd

        Sure it is. That’s what cognitive dissonance gets you: Hypocrisy.

    • Grace Kim Kwon

      Fill the vacuum.

    • james blue

      It’s not that they are silent, it’s that you either refused to listen or made no attempt to find out if they have gone after Islam

      This site doesn’t allow links, but if you google or use the search engine of your choice “FFRF islam” you will see that they go after Islam too including in schools.
      They even go after schools facilitating prayer time for Muslim students

      From their website-

      Muslim prayer time protested in school

      The Foundation sent a letter Jan. 3 following up on an earlier complaint about Edison High School, Edison, N.J., facilitating Friday prayer times in the school gym for Muslim students.

      FFRF Senior Attorney Rebecca Markert’s initial letter, last October, noted the principal’s September memo to all staff regarding Friday prayer called Jummah or Jumu’ah. (A new memo, with later calendar dates added, went out in November.)

      Markert wrote, “Our complainant informs us that some of the Muslim students ‘have been granted permission to perform their Friday prayers during rotating periods, 10, 11, 12.’ We further understand that these students are excused from these periods for 15 minutes in order to pray. It is also our information and understanding that these students are granted access to the high school auditorium for their prayers.”

      The district responded negatively Nov. 1 to FFRF’s request that the practice stop.

      “Given the history of this practice, we believe the Friday prayer practice will continue during 2011,” Markert’s second letter said. “Edison High School violates the Establishment Clause each time Muslim students are released from their normal classroom obligations to pray in the school auditorium.”

  • Stephen

    Does it occur to anybody that since the US is overflowing with rich Christian history and with Christian artifacts like this Ten Commandment monument, that the current interpretation of separation of Church and state must be wrong?

    The framers of this country, most of whom were Christian, did not exclude the God they served from government. On the contrary, their prayer was that He be altogether in the midst of it.

    The founding of our government and country by Christians on Christian biblical principles is what brought the blessing of God on the US.

    All of us must recognize that these decades-old efforts to “separate church and state” are not based on truth but rather a lie, and satans people are the proponents of it.

    One or a few people in rebellion against God, supported by judges in rebellion against God, being able to thwart the will of a community of Christian people in the US with its founding documents and history is absurd!

    • Ambulance Chaser

      It probably occurs to a lot of people but it doesn’t matter whether the courts interpretation is “wrong” or “right.” It has to be followed regardless of how you feel about it.

      • Stephen

        Yes, I’m sure it does occur to quite a few people. The effect I was trying for was a groundswell of push-back against these attacks on Christian freedoms in what was founded a Christian country.

        Some will be shocked or worse yet, offended, by my American patriotism for saying this, but for reasons like preserving christian freedoms is why the 1st and 2nd amendments were written into the constitution. In fact, the founders of the US and citizens like them exercised what is written in both those amendments securing Christian freedom and personal liberty for us all.

        Today, we don’t recognize how important the principles this country were founded on are. Instead we listen to evil telling us to shrink back, and when we do evil fills that vacuum. Evil is always trying to convince us to shrink back!

        Meanwhile, evil is taking more and more ground with the ambition to finally outnumber and out power God’s people and then to destroy every vestige of Christianity, and all the while God WOULD help us to defeat it, if we would.

        Our children will say why did you let them have America? Why did you betray so many people who died to create and preserve this nation founded on Christianity and its principles.

        The great American experiment, the first and last nation of its kind in world history, will have been overthrown not by enemies without, but by enemies within, without firing a shot.

        • Ambulance Chaser

          Wow, melodramatic much? The only “rights” you have lost are the right to have the government officially affirm your religion to the exclusion of others, and the right to impose it on the unwilling. And you think that’s too much?

          • Stephen

            Melodramatic? I see, you don’t know what you’re talking. Shortsighted ideas and whitewashed attitudes like yours are also part of the problem.

          • Ambulance Chaser

            So you’re not actually going to respond to anything I said?

        • antifasciste

          Care to support any of your hyperbole from original sources that are not poorly interpreted quotes taken out of context?

      • Royce E. Van Blaricome

        Thank you for showing everyone that you support Blacks not being fully human, women not having the vote and not being able to hold certain public office, and the prohibition against Interracial Marriage.

        • Ambulance Chaser

          I don’t recall saying I support any of that, and I certainly can’t imagine why you’d thank me for it if I did.

          • Royce E. Van Blaricome

            Well, let me help you with your imagination then, SCOTUS upheld ALL of those and you said “it doesn’t matter whether the courts interpretation is “wrong” or “right.” It has to be followed regardless of how you feel about it.”

            And I thanked you because I always appreciate it when you folks show yourselves for who you are, publicly display your sense of reasoning and morality, and completely discredit yourselves so we don’t have to waste the time doing so.

          • Ambulance Chaser

            So you believe that “it must be followed whether you like it or not” means “I like every ruling SCOTUS hands down?”

          • Royce E. Van Blaricome

            I never said that. I said I believe what you said. If you don’t mean what you say, that’s you’re problem. I can’t read minds and contrary to Liberals, I don’t try to.

    • antifasciste

      Interesting rhetoric, never the less, not actually founded in any sense of reality.

    • Guzzman

      If the Constitution, our founding document, is based on “Christian biblical principles”, why did the men who wrote it, advocated and explained its meaning to the people during the ratification debates fail to say so? We have the Federalist Papers, written by John Jay, Alexander Hamilton, and James Madison to explain each provision of the Constitution. In those essays they explain the origin of many of those provisions and there is not a SINGLE reference to the Bible or to Christian theology. Given that the Federalist Papers were written to explain and defend the provisions of the Constitution to a predominately Christian populace, it would certainly have helped their cause to cite biblical support for those ideas; they could not, because none exists.

      If the Constitution is overflowing with Christian principles then why, over the course of more than a century after the Constitution was ratified, were attempts made over and over again by Christian groups such as the National Reform Association to add a “Christian nation” amendment to that document. Seems redundant, doesn’t it, that if the Constitution was already overflowing with Christian principles, why would Christians keep trying to add Christian ideas and language to it? The conservative Christian position from the very start was that the Constitution was a “godless document” that would bring down God’s wrath upon us all.

  • Stephen

    Lawsuits against Christian religious freedom should be made illegal!

    • Bezukhov

      And lawsuits against non Christian religious freedoms should be mandatory? Or better, they shouldn’t have any freedoms at all?

  • Grace Kim Kwon

    American schools need the Ten Commandment monuments! In America, removal of the Ten Commandments means removal of morality altogether.

    • Tom-Elizabeth Berning

      C.S. Lewis > Quotes > Quotable Quote
      “Education without values, as useful as it is, seems rather to make man a more clever devil.”
      ― C.S. Lewis

      • Grace Kim Kwon

        Yes, he only meant godless education. Read his “Mere Christianity.” Western educational system was established so that every child could read the Holy Bible firsthand and think and decides on his own. The Holy Bible alone enables people to beat up slave owners and break free.

      • Grace Kim Kwon

        Thank you. I’m sorry I initially misunderstood your intention; atheists relpy me usually. I made changes in my first comments.

  • InTheChurch

    I like how the money was brought up first. The root of all evil is the love of money and this atheist group proves it.

    • Shane Egan

      Do you genuinely believe that the Jesus of the bible would support the wealth that many churches have, or are they not really Christian in your view?

      • PlanetoftheAtheists

        Not to mention the ‘big government’ tax breaks. This religion is too weak to support itself without fear, money or government influence

      • InTheChurch

        That is why I stay away from those churches. I rather be at a small, personal and working church and not at a mega church. Some people who attend mega churches are followers of Christ and some are not. Some pastors are pharisees and some are not. The same goes with small churches. But for this atheist group, it’s all about the money.

        • Croquet_Player

          “But for this atheist group, it’s all about the money.” Actually no. They always send a few letters to the relevant authorities first, warning them that they are in violation of the constitution. They clearly explain the nature of the violation, and provide examples of similar cases. If the authorities remove the item or items that are in violation, that’s the end of the problem and there’s no court case. If it were “all about the money” they wouldn’t bother sending several letters of warning. Furthermore, while they will accept fines to cover their legal costs, they don’t seek further damages. (Unless they are representing a client like a student who is entitled to damages.) If damages are required in the judgement, they’ll accept the symbolic one dollar, which they then donate.

          • InTheChurch

            are you a proud member?

          • Croquet_Player

            I’m a proud donor. Not sure if my membership is still current. Thanks for the reminder!

  • Croquet_Player

    Don’t want to pay hefty fines? Don’t put up religious monuments on public property. Put up all the monuments you like on private property.

    • The General

      It would be poetic justice if your neighbors in the trailer park put up crosses and other Christians symbols all over their lots. You’d be on the phone to ACLU in a heartbeat, talking about how “offended” and “persecuted” are you.

      The Atheist WHINE Club. What a bunch of intolerant crybabies.

      • Ambulance Chaser

        No, we wouldn’t, because that would not be illegal and there would be nothing the ACLU could or would want to do about it.

      • james blue

        I doubt he’d be calling the ACLU, but if he did the response would be “it’s private property, they can do that”

        What would you do if your neighbors erected satanic goatman statues on their front lawns?

      • Croquet_Player

        Darling, I live in San Francisco. We don’t have trailer parks here. But it says something unsavory about you that you would attempt to insult someone by suggesting they don’t have much money because they might live in a trailer park, and there’s something wrong with that. In fact if I’m not mistaken, Jesus loved the poor. Apparently this is where you differ with Jesus. Would you like to put up a religious monument on your property? If you’re my neighbor, and a nice person, I’ll drive you to Home Depot to get the materials. I have a big SUV with a roof rack. I’ll help you put all the stuff on my car and drive you home. If you break your leg, I’ll walk your dog, pick up groceries for you, and drive you to your church on Sunday. But you may not put up religious monuments on public property.

        • The General

          Oh, beautiful San Francisco – no trailer parks, but 8,000 homeless people on the streets.

          Only an addle-brained leftist would think that sleeping under a bridge and wandering through the streets drunk is better than living in a trailer. Hey, come to beautiful, sophisticated, cosmopolitan Frisco – one of the highest homeless populations in America! You can tell we’re a compassionate city – look at all the people sleeping in parks!

          You picked a good location at least, not much rain there, and winters are mild.

          • Croquet_Player

            We do have a lot of homeless people here. Many of them migrate from states that (illegally) put mentally ill people on a bus with a one-way ticket. (It’s called patient dumping, and we’re currently suing Nevada over this.) And we offer better services for those who want to get off the streets. Our property values are among the highest in the nation and we have good weather. California is the sixth largest economy in the world (we just went ahead of France) and we give more money to the Federal government than we take in, keeping many red states afloat. Yeah, we’ll take the hit for all that prosperity. Try not to be too jealous.

          • blobclark

            why would i be jealous of San Sodom ? our property values are the highest. Love money much ?

          • Croquet_Player

            I like it when people aren’t stuck in poverty because of where they live. Like some red states. “San Sodom”. Oh, that’s so funny.

          • The General

            I love your sense of humor – the rest of America is “jealous” of San Francisco. LOL

            The AIDS capital of the universe.
            8,000 mentally ill homeless people urinating in public.

            And you think Americans are JEALOUS of the diseased rat-hole you live in?

          • Croquet_Player

            Our billion dollar touristy industry alone shows that people seem to like our city quite a lot. And red states seem to have no trouble accepting our largess since we pay more into the federal government than we take out. Why so cranky? Did the Giants beat your team on the way to one of their three World Series victories in recent years? Losing is tough, try to get over it.

          • Ambulance Chaser

            Your insults directed at San Francisco are very fascinating, but are you going to address the points made or not?

          • FHRITP

            The Private previously chastised Shane for using a strawman defense. Here The Private uses a strawman defense with Croquet_Player. The Private is nothing if not hypocritical!

      • FHRITP

        “…Neighbors in the trailer park??” That is a very petty comment. The Private clearly has trouble understanding the addage of that which he/she sees in others is a reflection of that which exists in him/her. Private? Private? Where did he/she go?

  • Shane Egan

    I find the use of “professing” in your description of atheists to be quite bizarre. You never do this with people of other faiths, or even Buddhists who also do not believe in a god, but you routinely imply that atheists actually really know that god exists but don’t want to admit it. Wrong, belief is not something you choose, you arrive at beliefs based upon evidence and I see no more evidence for the Christian god than I do for leprechauns.

    All you are doing is making professed Christians look petty.

    • The General

      It’s the atheists who are petty and meddlesome.

      Because you have no life at all.

      • Chris

        Is that how Jesus would behave? insulting others? Don’t the Gospels speak of turning the other cheek? Or doesn’t that apply to you?

        • The General

          Missy, telling the truth is a Christian virtue. Atheists are petty and meddlesome, and that’s truth.

          In fact, they’re also genocidal – and I have several million dead bodies as evidence.

          Truth is always “insulting” to pathological liars.

          • Chris

            “Missy, telling the truth is a Christian virtue. Atheists are petty and meddlesome, and that’s truth.”

            Since when do insults have to go along with what you believe is the truth?

            “In fact, they’re also genocidal – and I have several million dead bodies as evidence.”

            So the people you were insulting are genocidal? Evidence?

            “Truth is always “insulting” to pathological liars.”
            You certainly are.

          • FHRITP

            Christians did not invent the notion of telling the truth.

      • FHRITP

        Your statement implies believers aren’t. A more truthful wording of your comment is “Pettiness and meddlesomeness are traits all humans have.”

  • PlanetoftheAtheists

    This woman has received numerous death threats and personal insults,
    by you wonderful people of faith. Our Founders made damn sure
    religionists would have no power in our SECULAR government, and it’s not
    hard to figure out why.
    There is nothing wrong with demanding our Constitution be respected.
    Our government is expressly forbidden from endorsing religion. This
    keeps all of us safe, how would you like to see a Muslim majority
    inflict their beliefs on a local school board or city councils? Or a
    Satanist place “In Lucifer We Trust” on police cruisers? You Christians
    are extremely privileged folks: pandering by virtually every politician,
    billion dollar tax breaks, mega churches on every corner, charter
    schools, the right to indoctrinate your children without it being
    designated child abuse, on and on…you have no business using our
    government resources to force your myths on the rest of us, especially
    on our children when their parents are not there to defend them.

    • The General

      Hogwash. E-mails and phone calls are very easy to trace. If Christians were making threats to this woman, they would be arrested and charged with a crime. They haven’t been, because they aren’t making death threats. Like all atheists, you lie a lot.

      • Shane Egan

        Actual studies, you know with numbers and analysis, show that countries with higher rates of religion have higher rates of crimes and lower standards of living. That also applies to individual states in the U.S – the highest rates of abortion are in the most religious states.

        I think you sincerely believe in your religion but you come across as angry and bitter – surely the person who really believes they have the support of the supreme being of the universe should be better than that. You should always take the high road and not be afraid of people who question your beliefs – surely your god, and you, should not be afraid of questions? Or is it that you actually fear that your beliefs cannot stand the cold, hard light of day?

        • The General

          Fggot, your little sermon has nothing to do with my post.

          I was pointing out that e-mails and phone calls can be traced, and they have not been, so there is no proof at all that Christians are making threats.

          It’s 2017, and apparently you atheists don’t eve know what Caller ID is. Some atheist claims “Christians are making death threats!” and you people don’t even ask for proof.

          • Shane Egan

            Ah, a troll. Forgive me, I thought you were actually a Christian.

          • The General

            You’re the atheist on a Christian blog.

            Get a life. Lots of porn sites for your sort.

          • FHRITP

            Got you there. I’ll add to that your asking for forgiveness like a Catholic.

          • FHRITP

            The Private criticizes atheists for being liars in a post which contains his/her lies, let alone ignorance. “Apparently” The Private doesn’t eve (sic) know what caller ID block is, and prepaid cellular is. Identifying me if I use those is often impossible, not easy. Let alone notes on her windshield, in her mailbox, etc. The Private must not read comment sections much if he/she doesn’t believe crystal clearly that when they believe their faith is threatened, Christians act violently often.

  • Grace Kim Kwon

    USA must fear God and submit to Him instead to atheists; Post-christian sinfulness is always far worse than Pre-christian barbarism.

    “‘I have set her in the midst of the nations and the countries all around her. She has rebelled against My judgments by doing wickedness more than the nations, and against My statutes more than the countries that are all around her; for they have refused My judgments, and they have not walked in My statutes.’ Therefore thus says the Lord God: ‘Because you have multiplied disobedience more than the nations that are all around you, have not walked in My statutes nor kept My judgments, nor even done according to the judgments of the nations that are all around you’ — therefore thus says the Lord God: ‘Indeed I, even I, am against you and will execute judgments in your midst in the sight of the nations.” ( from Ezekiel chapter 5)

  • Danhill Rider

    The most dangerous and stupid thing in this world is to exist without believing that there is God who created them.

    In 1892, in the case of Church of the Holy Trinity vs. the United States, the Supreme Court ruled that the Church has precedence over state and federal law, because this is a “Christian Nation.” in the court opinion written by Mr. Justice David J. Brewer, the court felt that:
    “No purpose of action against religion can be imputed to any legislation, state or national, because this is a religious people. This is historically true. From the discovery of this continent, to the present hour, there is a single voice making this affirmation…”

    From there, the Justice went on to give various examples of America’s connection to Christianity in documents ranging from foundational principles set forth for the colonies to the constitutions of several of the states to a myriad of court cases supporting Biblical principles, all of which supported Christianity as the basis of America’s laws and government.

    One argument from the state of Pennsylvania even went so far as to say that the defense of Christianity was a necessity, while the defense of the religions of the “imposters” Muhammad and the Dalai Lama were not. From these precedents, Mr. Justice Brewer has this to say in his concluding remarks:

    “These and many other matters, which might be noticed, add a volume of unofficial declarations to the mass of organic utterances that this is a Christian Nation.”
    If the Supreme Court found this to be a “Christian Nation” even 116 years after the Declaration of Independence, then it is odd we should find otherwise today. Somewhere along the way, America have lost connection with its roots – its moral compass was replaced by moral relativism and the ship of this great nation began to drift off course.

  • Danhill Rider

    The most dangerous and stupid thing in this world is to exist without believing that there is God who created them.

    In 1892, in the case of Church of the Holy Trinity vs. the United States, the Supreme Court ruled that the Church has precedence over state and federal law, because this is a “Christian Nation.” in the court opinion written by Mr. Justice David J. Brewer, the court felt that:

    “No purpose of action against religion can be imputed to any legislation, state or national, because this is a religious people. This is historically true. From the discovery of this continent, to the present hour, there is a single voice making this affirmation…”

    From there, the Justice went on to give various examples of America’s connection to Christianity in documents ranging from foundational principles set forth for the colonies to the constitutions of several of the states to a myriad of court cases supporting Biblical principles, all of which supported Christianity as the basis of America’s laws and government.

    One argument from the state of Pennsylvania even went so far as to say that the defense of Christianity was a necessity, while the defense of the religions of the “imposters” Muhammad and the Dalai Lama were not. From these precedents, Mr. Justice Brewer has this to say in his concluding remarks:

    “These and many other matters, which might be noticed, add a volume of unofficial declarations to the mass of organic utterances that this is a Christian Nation.”

    If the Supreme Court found this to be a “Christian Nation” even 116 years after the Declaration of Independence, then it is odd we should find otherwise today. Somewhere along the way, America have lost connection with its roots – its moral compass was replaced by moral relativism and the ship of this great nation began to drift off course.

    The United States adopted the Ten Commandments and laws of the Bible as the basis for its own laws. The newly-born nation rejected tyranny , creating a constitution of checks and balances to control government power, and also declined to embrace the old faith.

    • Shane Egan

      Actually, English Common Law was the basis for the U.S judicial system. Indeed, the Ten Commandments themselves do NOT fit well with the U.S constitution:

      “You shall have no other gods before Me” – The constitution permits freedom of religion.

      “You shall not make for yourself a carved image” – The freedom of expression is a firm principle of the U.S, including creating images of whatever gods or idols you want to.

      “You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain” – nothing in the constitution about blasphemy and again consider the idea of freedom of speech.

      “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy” – again, nothing about not working on Sunday or being compelled to go to church anywhere in the constitution.

      “Honor your father and your mother” – nothing in the constitution about this either.

      For a country supposedly ‘based on the ten commandments’ they seem conspicuously absent from the actual text of the constitution.

      As for Justice Brewer, he clarified his earlier ruling later and said,

      “But in what sense can it be called a Christian nation? Not in the sense that Christianity is the established religion or that people are in any matter compelled to support it. On the contrary, the Constitution specifically provides that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof.” Neither is it Christian in the sense that all of its citizens are either in fact or name Christian. On the contrary, all religions have free scope within our borders. Numbers of our people profess other religions, and many reject all. Nor is it Christian in the sense that a profession of Christianity is a condition of holding office or otherwise engaging in public service, or essential to recognition either politically or socially. In fact, the government as a legal organization is independent of all religions. ”

      Even the ‘star of the supreme court’ for the right, Scalia said that decision was, “nothing but an invitation to judicial lawmaking”.

  • blobclark

    FFRF leaders can proceed straight to hades, but they dont believe in it so… not much to do there. we have been warned that end times will be such as sodom . This is what is called “lawfare” folks, the using of an interpretation of law to facilitate a certain point of view no matte what a group or majority or believers say or wish. mans laws will be stronger until the return of the lion to fight the final battle with evil. We will need marks to work and eat. Is it our social sec number or credit cards ? will it be something else ? surely, i do not know but I do not fear these times even though i know my body will pay the ultimate price to defend the lord in these times.