Wisconsin Teacher Placed on Leave After Using Ouija Board in Kindergarten Class

MILWAUKEE, Wisc. — A public school teacher in Wisconsin has been placed on leave after using an Ouija board in her kindergarten classroom.

The incident occurred at Zablocki Elementary in Milwaukee last week, although the teacher, who has not been identified, says that the board had been in the room since Halloween.

She had been contacted by a concerned parent who learned that her five-year-old son had been exposed to the activity. The boy told his mother that his teacher turned off the lights, took out the board, and began talking about scary stories.

“The kids have been asking for a scary story and I got the board and moved the paper clip to answer some of their questions. They asked about scary characters in movies,” the teacher responded to the parent via e-mail. “It was all done in fun.”

However, she said that she understood the parent’s concerns.

“I will take the board home and this won’t happen again,” she wrote.

The mother says that her son has been having nightmares since that day. She doesn’t believe kindergartners should be exposed to Ouija boards.

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“He’s scared now to go to bed at night, to be in the dark, anything alone,” she told reporters.

The teacher has now been placed on leave while the school investigates.

“I’m happy that she’s being investigated. Maybe she’ll think twice about doing something in the future,” the mother told WISN-TV. She has now called for the teacher to be fired, and although she is being criticized for doing so, she says she believes she did what was right.

As previously reported, in December 2014, Google reported that searches for Ouija boards had risen 300 percent following the release of the film “Ouija.” Despite the film’s conclusion that “some things aren’t meant to be played with,” the movie reportedly piqued the interest of many of its viewers.

“The fact that people’s intention is to contact the spiritual realm outside the blessings and parameters that God has set out could lead to them to connect with the evil spiritual realm,” Darren Gallagher, a spokesman for Ellel Ministries, told Christian Today at that time. “Therefore such things as Ouija boards are not just harmless fun, but could potentially be spiritually dangerous for those who take part in such things.”

He noted that in the book of Acts, the people “gathered together their occultic objects and burned them because they knew that these practices were not compatible with their new life in Christ.”


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  • Lexical Cannibal

    I imagine there are a couple people around here expecting me to stick up for this teacher.

    Nah dude, even when it’s not part of a religious practice, that’s super inappropriate, especially for kindergartners. Spiritual stuff aside, ouija boards are so controversial that any attempt to bring them into an educational setting should be done so with extreme care and clear intentions or you’re gonna have half the school fetching an old priest and a young priest because the AC’s making funny noises. Suspension and discipline is the right reaction here. Ouija boards don’t really belong in educational settings, especially not grade schools.

  • james blue

    Kind of make you think about if wanting teachers to be free to express their religious beliefs in the classroom is such a good thing after all doesn’t it.

    • Amos Moses

      and all the “scientists” fail to recognize that nature abhors a vacuum …. and when you remove one thing and create a void ……. something will seek to fill it in …… in all realms …….

    • bowie1

      Of course it was seen as a “scary story”.

  • Croquet_Player

    There is one way a Ouija board can be dangerous. If it falls off a shelf during an earthquake and hits you in the head. It’s total nonsense. But it is helpful as a demonstration that people will believe the most utterly absurd things.

    • Amos Moses

      interesting that those who want all religion scrubbed from schools FAIL to recognize occult religion as part of that ……

      • Croquet_Player

        Was she teaching occult religion in school? No. Do Ouija boards actually DO anything? No.

        • Amos Moses

          makes no difference what she was teaching and it makes no difference what a board can do or not do ….. it is occultic practice, witchcraft and religion ……….

          • Croquet_Player

            It does make a HUGE difference what she was teaching. You say it’s “occult”. Other people say that’s nonsense, and it’s nothing more than a parlor game intended to be “spooky”. By the way, I always find it hilarious when Christians put any credence whatsoever in things they deem “occult”. It’s totally absurd, but every story needs a bad guy, right? Zazzes up the plot line. Next we’ll have to ban ‘The Wizard of Oz’ because it’s got witches in it. (And a fake wizard. Which is a valuable lesson you failed to grasp from the story – the big scary wizard is a total sham.)

          • Amos Moses

            “I always find it hilarious when Christians put any credence whatsoever in things they deem “occult”. ”

            supernatural is supernatural ….. i find it comical that most would rather believe in UFOs and “extra-terrestrial” life than God ….. when it is all is supernatural …..

            “Next we’ll have to ban ‘The Wizard of Oz’ because it’s got witches in it”

            nope ….. actually L. Frank Baum was writing about the central banking system …..

          • Croquet_Player

            “supernatural is supernatural” Tautology is tautology.

            “i find it comical that most would rather believe in UFOs and “extra-terrestrial” life than God” I believe in UFOs, because a UFO is an “Unidentified Flying Object”. Somebody saw something in the sky, apparently flying, and they don’t know what it is. That’s a UFO. People see these things all the time. Now, we can discuss the likelihood of what it might be. Is it more likely to be a metallic mylar balloon that escaped from some outdoor party decorations? Or a spacecraft piloted by aliens? We have zero evidence that alien spacecrafts are visiting our planet, and countless examples of balloons that got away. We also have loads of evidence of other things, weather balloons, toy drone helicopters, model rockets and airplanes, etc. The list of ordinary objects flying around in the sky that an observer cannot identify looking up from the ground, unaided by binoculars or a telescope or something, is endless. It is preposterous to leap to the conclusion that it’s an alien thing.

            “when it is all is supernatural …..” No, it’s not. Neither UFO’s nor alien life (should it exist) are “supernatural”. Is there life on other planets? Given the many billions of galaxies in the universe, with planets like ours orbiting stars like ours, since life popped up here, it’s not unreasonable to think that it’s quite possible life may have popped up elsewhere too. Do we KNOW this? No, we certainly do not.

            Yes, Baum was writing about the banking system, and the larger message is to look behind the curtain to see what’s really going on.

          • Jason Todd

            As a matter of fact, I’ve seen what can only be called a UFO. Up close. With three other people present.

            You know, you ought to move on and yield to the your impersonator. It’s clear between the two of you he’s the only one who knows what he’s talking about.

          • johndoe

            Sure you have

          • Croquet_Player

            So, you, and three other people, saw something in the sky that none of you were able to identify. Well, while I’m sure that was fairly interesting and unusual for you and your friends, the fact is people see things they can’t identify in the sky all the time.

            Hey, way to support identity theft. I’m of the opinion that behavior is wrong, (if not downright creepy), but I understand not everyone shares my morals.

          • Jason Todd

            No, I know what I saw. It was triangular with lights all over it, hovering over trees and making no sound at all. 1986, New Paltz, NY.

          • Croquet_Player

            You know what Jason? I really kind of like you right here. You’re doing some reasonable things. You are reporting something you saw, you give a clear description, you say there are other witnesses, and you provide a date and location. Now, what you saw is a UFO. An “Unidentified Flying Object”. (And people must stop conflating the term UFO with “I saw something that I can only imagine was an alien spacecraft, therefore it’s an alien spacecraft.”) But, I’m entirely willing to assume you’re being honest here, and in all well-intentioned goodwill, I take you at your word. Is that “evidence”? Sure, but it’s anecdotal evidence. It might be convincing to you, but there’s no reason for it to be convincing to others.

            What if it was an alien spacecraft? What if you and your friends ate some funny mushrooms, or field greens in a salad, at a dinner party, by accident which may have clouded your judgement? What if a neighbor built something in his barn and was pulling an elaborate prank? There is simply no way for us to investigate your report further. You say you saw something unusual. Fair enough, I take you at your word. Let’s put this in the category of “A person, and some witnesses, claims they saw something unusual, and until further information becomes available, we are unable to make a determination on what it was.”

            I’ll tell you what, the day an alien spacecraft crashes on earth, that’ll be interesting. Have you seen “Independence Day”? I love that movie. I watch it every time it shows up on TV, even when I’m supposed to be doing other things. My dear late cousin was a highly decorated Air Force X-plane test pilot. “X” meaning experimental. He flew all sorts of crazy things, at crazy speeds. His test flights, together with his teammates, led to the development of the Space Shuttle. Cool, right?

    • Jason Todd

      Again, prove it. With citations.

      • johndoe

        From one who never supports anything they post

      • Croquet_Player

        A Ouiji board is an object. Objects can fall off shelves during earthquakes. (See: law of universal gravitation, “Principia”, Sir Issac Newton, 1687.)

        • Jason Todd

          That’s not what I meant, and you know it.

          • Croquet_Player

            I’m sorry, please restate the question and I’ll do my best.

    • Karl N Sherry Ditzler

      Hmmm you claim there are no demons. However you are being manipulated by them and Satan loves it! He laughs at you! Why? Because you feed into his devilish thinking. If you believe there are no demons,then there is no devil ie Satan and so surely won’t believe there is a God Almighty. You are spiritually blind because you are spiritually dead. In order for you to see in the third dimension you must be born again spiritually. and the only way you can do this is to acknowledge you are sinner in need of redemption, accepting God Almighty’s only way of forgiveness for your sins through His Son Jesus Christ Until then you will continue to serve the master of sin Satan and believe whatever lies he would like you to believe. You can choose the lies you believe because he is the father of lies so any number of his lies will do. For the Quija board, it’s original creator is Satan who introduced it to the unregenerated minds of men/women via his demons this is so it can be used as a portal to open up the third dimentional doorways to him and his demons. You know the exsistance of EVIL, but you fail to recognize the one who authors it.

      • Croquet_Player

        I say there is no evidence for demons. When you or anyone else has some evidence, feel free to produce it.

  • InTheChurch

    Remove the bible from school but bring in a few demons. That is wonderful. NOT!!!!!

    • Croquet_Player

      I’m not sure which is more astonishing – that you believe that there really are such things as “demons”, or that you believe moving a plastic thing around on some made-in-China piece of cardboard covered with printed paper would cause anything at all to really happen. *Facepalm*.

      • Jason Todd

        There’s plenty of evidence regarding the existence of demons. And incidents involving Ouija boards.

        Instead of facepalming, prove me wrong.

        • johndoe

          Can you points to said evidence for demons?

          • Chet

            Sure, just take a good look around you, noting the evening news. What do you think is behind mankind’s heinous acts, that is, besides their own sinfulness…

        • Croquet_Player

          I’m not the one making the claim there are demons. The burden of proof is on the claimant. To date, there is no credible evidence of demons, or the effectiveness of Ouiji boards.

          • Jason Todd

            First, it’s spelled *Ouija.* Second, I never made a claim in the first place. The claim was, “There are no demons.” And that came from you.

            I know, you think there’s no God, no Satan, no demons, no angels, and you are protected from any and all challenges because you don’t have to prove a negative.

            This is intellectual laziness. And it doesn’t play here.

            Even the world’s best skeptics have to provide a reason for their way of thinking. It’s why publications like Skeptical Enquirer exists.

            What makes you so special the same standards don’t apply?

            Last time: Prove it. Put up or shut up.

          • Ambulance Chaser

            There’s nothing to prove. Croquet_Player is not stating an affirmative claim. He’s staying that no evidence exists for demons.

            You said that there was (which is an affirmative claim.) So let’s see some.

          • Croquet_Player

            Is there evidence of demons? No. There is none. When you, or anyone else, can produce the slightest shred of evidence, let me know. Until then, there is no good reason to think demons exist.

          • Jason Todd

            Zak Bagans.

            Done.

          • Croquet_Player

            You are citing the name of a T.V. show host as “evidence”? Seriously?

          • Jason Todd

            Yes. Google him.

          • Croquet_Player

            Bagans has created a nice little career for himself starring in T.V. shows which purport to investigate so called “paranormal” activity. They are popular for the same reasons that horror is a popular movie genre, and ghost stories are popular – some people get a kick out of scary stories. He hasn’t produced actual evidence of “anything”. But he’s good at making a popular TV show.

          • Jason Todd

            He hasn’t produced actual “evidence” of anything.

            Which shows you have no idea what you are talking about.

            Zak may be arrogant, but his character is unimpeachable.

          • Croquet_Player

            Nothing Zak Bagans has produced has been confirmed by anyone other than himself. He claims to have been “possessed”, and to have had “a face-to-face encounter with the spirit of a suicidal woman”. (Both claims are unconfirmed.) He a filmmaker, not a scientist. Is he good at making scary TV shows in a documentary-style for entertainment? Absolutely. But until he produces actual evidence, nothing he does should be taken the least bit seriously by anyone.

          • Jason Todd

            And I am still waiting for you to indicate you are not making a blanket judgement on a subject you know nothing about.

            In fact, episodes of Ghost Adventures have featured physical manifestations of demonic activity. Your comment indicates you have never watched the program and seen the evidence as presented.

            Therefore, you not only do not believe in the existence of demons, you steadfastly refuse to introduce yourself to anything that may actually challenge it.

            Not. Impressed.

          • Croquet_Player

            You actually believe a TV show produced for entertainment shown on the Travel Channel really shows evidence of “demons”. Despite the fact that they have never produced anything verified. Well, I have some news for you. “Magic” acts in Vegas are tricks, not “real magic” and “Professional Wrestling” is staged. You should approach things with more skepticism, or you’ll be taken advantage of by every snake-oil salesman who stumbles into you.

          • Jason Todd

            Aaaaaaaaaaaand you did not say anything that disputes what I said. Including what I said about you.

          • Croquet_Player

            You haven’t provided “evidence”of anything. You have cited a TV show produced solely for entertainment. You say “episodes of Ghost Adventures have featured physical manifestations of demonic activity”. Well, you might THINK they do, but that isn’t “evidence”. Where is the independent corroboration from reputable sources? Where are the scientists asked in to confirm of debunk their show? Where is ANYTHING, that can literally even be described as “evidence”? Next, you’re going to tell me that re-runs of “Bewitched” are “evidence” for witches. It’s laughable, and kind of pathetic.

          • Jason Todd

            Your comments are laughable and pathetic. What are you offering?

            You continue to make blanket statements about a show you have not even watched.

            I said you refuse to open your mind to anything that may actually challenge your beliefs. You haven’t denied that.

            In short, you open your mouth on things you know nothing about. And you want it that way.

            Despite what you’ve been told, stupidity isn’t a virtue.

            But I’m done with you. Blocked.

          • Croquet_Player

            This poor guy. He believes “ghost shows” he sees on TV are “real”. Where did he learn this stuff?

          • Crystalsea

            If I said there’s no credible evidence for wind, could you show me some facts and proof that wind is really a thing? I could say that things just move about on their own, and by your example, ask you to prove its existence because you were the first to mention it. But more in relation to what you actually said, there’s no proof that its a plastic thing, made-in-China with a piece of cardboard covered with printed paper. Maybe its wood and that makes all the difference, maybe its metal or contains some harmful substance. Can you prove that plastic and paper is what its made of and that it was made in China to satisfy the validity your claim? You see the thing is, the proof of demons is everywhere (alien evidence anybody? Hmmm, cross dimensional beings come all this way to tell us not to believe in Jesus or christianity. Interesting.). But someone has to be willing to see the evidence. You are not.

          • Croquet_Player

            “You see the thing is, the proof of demons is everywhere” And yet, no one seems able to produce it.

          • Crystalsea

            Many people HAVE produced it, the fact that you haven’t SEEN any of it is not for lack of it existing, but for lack of you being willing to acknowledge that it exists. Just like proving the existence of God. The existence of God and Demons and a great many other things have been adequately proven to me. But then, I value truth above whatever I believe to be true or want to be true. I am certain that there are many proofs you have disregarded for a great many things, why focus so much on this one?

          • Croquet_Player

            Where is this “proof”? Where are the texts where we explain to schoolchildren in science class who it was who discovered conclusive proof of demons? Where are the University departments devoted to the study of these “supernatural” entities? Why don’t any schools offer a Ph.D. in “Demonology”? People may believe in whatever they like, leprechauns, the tooth fairy, or demons. But you never see disturbed people murdering their children out of a belief in the tooth fairy. “But then, I value truth above whatever I believe to be true or want to be true.” No, you value your beliefs, or you’d demand actual proof.

          • Crystalsea

            lets just give logic a try. 1, There’s at least as much proof for demons as there is for “evolution”, or any of the other things you “know”. 2, I don’t have time, energy or the will to cater a stockpile of proofs that may or may not be “exactly” the proofs you will require and subsequently accept as “adequate” or “reliable”. And finally 3, no, I’m not going to be googling that for you.

      • David MacKenzie

        Like it or not, Croquet, Jesus himself considered demonic existence to be matter-of-fact obvious. No mere materialist might agree; I get that. But when a famous Christian creed says, “We believe in all things— visible and invisible”, it is being quite serious. Christians have always believed in things beyond the visible and beyond the material, which also comes in handy when thinking of things like Quantum mechanics and Schrodinger’s cat.

        • Croquet_Player

          I don’t care who considers it “obvious”, there is no credible evidence of demons. (And I find it pretty sad I even have to say this in 2017.) That things operate differently at the quantum level is not evidence of demons, nor does it support any particular faith.

          • David MacKenzie

            Using “historicism” (and assumptions of continual “progress”) won’t work as a tactic in this exchange. I understand you’re a materialist; you don’t believe in anything that can’t be tested in a beaker. But you don’t win arguments by suggesting that because it’s 2017 demons don’t exist. This is rather like saying, “because it’s 2015, planets around TRAPPIST-1f, don’t exist.”

          • Croquet_Player

            Did I suggest that simply because it’s 2017 demons don’t exist? No, I certainly did not, and I’ll thank you not to misrepresent my words so casually. I cast a stern eye on this sort of slimy behavior. In the (paraphrased because she use a stronger term) words of “Judge Judy” “Don’t wee on my leg and tell me it’s raining.” Are there demons? Fine, produce evidence of one. While you’re at it, St. Patrick’s Day is coming up, and I was always charmed by the idea of leprechauns. (Irish Grandmother. Se had lovely stories.) So get busy.

          • David MacKenzie

            In fact, you did imply such a thing. A true materialist wouldn’t care whether he or she lived in 1203, 576, 2017 or otherwise. But you were the one who said you were particularly “sad you have to say this in 2017”, implying that time has, indeed, moved forward since (I assume) Jesus’ day. This is historicism— the idea that history is destined to always socially progress and never decay. And social progressives are typically enamoured with this theory.

          • Croquet_Player

            No, I most certainly did not. What I said was: (And I find it pretty sad I even have to say this in 2017.) Which you obviously know means that I am NOT hinging my argument on the calendar, but unlike the dates you mentioned, (1203, 576,) people have a lot more information available now, (you’re using a computer, and so am I) and anyone can easily look up the available data to back up a claim. I am stunned you would take this deliberately and manifestly false position as a tactic to bolster your argument. It’s disgraceful, but I suppose I shouldn’t be so surprised. It’s all too common.

          • David MacKenzie

            Feigned outrage is really lame.

          • Croquet_Player

            Lying is lame.

  • Ambulance Chaser

    I think I would have to side with the school on this one. While I don’t believe that ouija boards do–literally–anything, they are a symbol of a religion (or several pagan religions), and as such, a teacher using one is probably violating the Establishment Clause.

    • Croquet_Player

      I’m sorry, I have to disagree. From Wikipedia: “Following its commercial introduction by businessman Elijah Bond on July 1, 1890, the Ouija board was regarded as a parlor game unrelated to the occult until American Spiritualist Pearl Curran popularized its use as a divining tool during World War I. Spiritualists believed that the dead were able to contact the living
      and reportedly used a talking board very similar to a modern Ouija board
      at their camps in Ohio in 1886 to ostensibly enable faster
      communication with spirits.” No disrespect to Wiccans, and Pagans, who take their stuff as seriously as anyone else, but this means that anyone who adopts some everyday object into their “practice” means that people who take the “occult” seriously and are genuinely frightened by it can get it pitched out of schools. Harry Potter? Occult. Halloween? Occult. All fairy stories? Occult. Sometimes a parlor game is just a parlor game.

      • Bob Johnson

        Manufactured by Hasbro, the same company that make Monopoly and Rubik’s Cube. Available from Amazon for thirty bucks.

  • Imporess Gigi

    Administrative leave??? If she had read a bible story she would have been villified and crucified. She should be fired, license revoked, publicly flogged, tarred and feathered, and run out of town. And made to pay for that little boy’s counseling. Period.

  • Chet

    What the heck is wrong with teachers nowadays…