Judge Roy Moore Renews Call for Effort to Amend U.S. Constitution to Ban Same-Sex ‘Marriage’

Moore

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, also known as the “Ten Commandments Judge,” says that he plans to keep pressing for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution following Friday’s Supreme Court ruling in favor of same-sex “marriage.”

“There is no such thing as same-sex marriage in the Constitution. The words are not there, we’ve never had it in our history,” he told CNN on Friday. “Five judges on the Supreme Court, or justices, have presumed to find a fundamental right which has no basis in the history or logic or tradition of our country.”

Moore said that he believes the justices followed their personal feelings rather than the rule of law.

“I think the law of the land is plain. It’s the United States Constitution,” he stated. “Not an opinion of the Supreme Court which contradicts that law.”

Moore also advised reporters that the Supreme Court can be petitioned for a re-hearing within 25 days of a ruling. He said that while it is rare for the court to do so, he hoped that the justices would consider the strong dissent in the case.

The judge also said that he would continue to press for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution protecting the institution of marriage.

“I believe that would be what it takes to overcome this errant Supreme Court,” Moore stated. “There’s got to be some way to draw them back to reality.”

  • Connect with Christian News

As previously reported, last February, Moore unveiled a draft amendment as he mailed letters to each governor, lieutenant governor and legislative body in all 50 states, urging the formation of a convention to add the language to the Constitution.

“Nothing in this Constitution or in the constitution or laws of any state shall define or shall be construed to define marriage except as the union of one man and one woman, and no other union shall be recognized with the legal incidents thereof within the United States or any place subject to their jurisdiction,” it read.

Moore noted that Article V of the U.S. Constitution allows for Congress to call a convention for proposed amendments that obtain the approval of two-thirds of the states.

But regardless of whether or not a re-hearing is granted or an amendment is passed, he said that he believes that legal battles over the matter are far from over.

“I think it is just the beginning,” Moore stated. “I think it’s the beginning just like when the court in 1857 declared that black people were property. It had no right to do that and there was a long turmoil there after. There was actually the civil war and there was a constitutional amendment.”

He also made clear that he hold no animosity toward homosexuals, but does not believe the government has the right to change the definition of marriage for a select group of people.

“They can celebrate and I’m sure they will, but they’re not celebrating because the Constitution was upheld. They’re celebrating because it was violated, and I think that’s the point. They’re celebrating because they got their way,” Moore told WKRG-TV.

“I have no animosity to people. It’s not about hating homosexual people or hating gay people,” he stated. “It’s about adhering to the Constitution and the traditional definition of marriage and that’s what we should do.”


A special message from the publisher...

Dear Reader, our hearts are deeply grieved by the ongoing devastation in Iraq, and through this we have been compelled to take a stand at the gates of hell against the enemy who came to kill and destroy. Bibles for Iraq is a project to put Arabic and Kurdish audio Bibles into the hands of Iraqi and Syrian refugees—many of whom are illiterate and who have never heard the gospel.Will you stand with us and make a donation today to this important effort? Please click here to send a Bible to a refugee >>

Print Friendly