‘It’s Not My Job to … Determine Their Salvation’: Baptist Woman Wears Hijab to Unite With Muslims

DeVries-compressed
Screenshot/Religion News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A Missouri woman whose husband works as a youth pastor recently decided to wear a hijab each Monday to show solidarity with Muslims, and states that it is not her “job to judge them or determine their salvation.”

Martha DeVries, 47, serves as a high school counselor and attends Chandler Baptist in Liberty. Her husband, Mike, serves part time as a youth pastor.

She says that part of her motivation to wear the hijab is what she perceives as anti-Islamic rhetoric during the 2016 presidential election.

“I’ve just gotten very tired of hearing so many negative things, like Donald Trump’s ‘let’s not let Muslim immigrants into the United States’ and the scare on Syrian refugees,” DeVries told Baptist News last month.

The other factor was a sermon that she heard at her church, which according to reports, “challenged Christians to push themselves beyond the limits of everyday, easy faith.”

DeVries also pointed to Christ’s admonition to love one’s neighbor and said, “I think of Muslims in my community as my neighbors and it’s not my job to judge them or determine their salvation. My job is to love them.”

She began wearing the hijab in December after first consulting with several Muslim women to ensure that it would not offend those of the Islamic faith.

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At first, some around her asked why she was wearing the headscarf.

“I said I’m trying to walk in someone else’s shoes,” DeVries said. “And I said I’m tired of people saying persecutory things about Muslims.”

Her husband supports the effort.

“I thought it was kind of cool actually,” he told reporters. “Christians need to take a step back and evaluate their actions. Are we really making a difference, in what our purpose is, by bashing people?”

As previously reported, also in December, former Wheaton professor Larycia Hawkins posted to Facebook two photos of herself wearing a hijab, and stated that she planned to wear it everywhere she went during the Advent—including at the college and to church.

“I stand in human solidarity with my Muslim neighbor because we are formed of the same primordial clay, descendants of the same cradle of humankind—a cave in Sterkfontein, South Africa that I had the privilege to descend into to plumb the depths of our common humanity in 2014,” Hawkins wrote.

Hawkins Photo Credit: Facebook
Hawkins
Photo Credit: Facebook

She said that not only does she have a common ancestry with Muslims, but that Christians and Muslims worship the same God.

“I stand in religious solidarity with Muslims because they, like me, a Christian, are people of the book,” Hawkins asserted. “And as Pope Francis stated last week, we worship the same God.”

Hawkins eventually left the college after controversy erupted, not about her hijab, but her assertion that Christians and Muslims worship the same God.

Some used the opportunity to outline why the concept is flawed in light of Scripture.

“Muslims hold that ‘God is one.’ Allah has no partners and assigning partners to him is shirk, the highest blasphemy,” explained Thabiti Anyabwile, pastor of Anacostia River Church in Washington, D.C., in a blog post for the Gospel Coalition. “Christians believe ‘God is one in three Persons.’ Each Person in the Trinity is fully and eternally God. Yet there is one God.”

He noted that as Muslims do not worship Jesus, who is God, Christians and Muslims do not worship the same God.

“No one knows God who does not know the Son, who is the only mediator between God and man,” Anyabwile said. “The goal of Christianity is the salvation of sinners through the righteousness, substitutionary atonement and resurrection of Jesus Christ.”


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  • Josey

    If you want to wear a head scarf go ahead but God nor His Son Jesus are the same as allah. Maybe you serve the same god as islam who is not the true God and are just masquerading as a Christian.

    • Ambulance Chaser

      “Allah” is just the word “God” in Arabic.

      • Guest

        No it isn’t. God in Arabic is إله (‘ilāh).

        • bowie1

          …which stands for “the God” (al + ilah).إله (Check the Google Translator)

          • Guest

            Nope. 🙂 Allah has become the proper name for the moon god. I’m currently aiding Bible translators in making a proper Arabic translation that does not involve the name allah.

          • waffleater

            the cresent didn’t become a popluar symbol for muslims until after the year 1000 or so

          • Guest

            Archaeology proves it’s older than that.

          • waffleater

            no archaeology proves that the colour green was most popular for early muslims, only really became a muslim symbol after the conversion of the turks

          • Guest

            Thanks for proving you’re just trolling. 🙂

          • waffleater

            thanks for proving you know nothing about history and Is just a conspiracy theorist who thinks everyone who refutes your garbage is trolling

        • Ambulance Chaser

          Looks like “Allah” to me. It can be anglicized multiple ways because there’s no one-to-one translation.

          • Guest

            You’re wrong. You clearly don’t know Arabic. 🙂 There would be no way to say, “There is no god but allah” if there weren’t separate ways to say “god” and “allah”.

          • RWH

            Why don’t people check things out with the Antiochian Orthodox Archdiocese of North America–whose Patriarch is in Demascus. They would be glad to tell you that the word Allah is in the Aramaic Bible and that it is the word to refer to God in the Arabic translation Divine Liturgy and other services of the church. The Church has eight dioceses within the United States and well over 400 parishes, all who could confirm what I say.

          • Guest

            Sorry, but that’s untrue. Former Muslims who have now become Christians are part of this movement to correct the misuse of the term “allah” for Yasu.

          • RWH

            I don’t really care what the heterodox have to say. Check with representatives of the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch. They are the ones who use who recite the liturgy every Sunday in churches all throughout the mideast. I’m not concerned with what some Protestant implant has to say.

          • Guest

            I’m discussing the Arabic language. 🙂 I’m a supporter of a new Arabic Bible translation that removes “allah” because it is the most accurate form.

          • RWH

            Unless you are a member of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch and have been authorized by the Holy Synod, you have no authority to speak for what goes on in the Orthodox Church. They were there first before Islam even took root, and the word Allah was the generic term for God in the Arabic language before Islam came around. Mohamed was familiar with both Jewish and Christian Scripture and lifted some of his ideas from those two sources. Protestants such as you are Johnny-come-latelys and do not control the definitions of words that have been traditionally used. What Protestants do with their Bible has absolutely nothing to do with what goes on within Orthodox churches the original custodian of Arabic Bible as put together at the Council of Nicea and used within the Holy Land and the Arabic world. The Orthodox Church is certainly not going to recognize whatever you decide to do to change meanings of words to suit your particular doctrinal proclivities.

          • Guest

            I’m talking about language. I know what allah means in Arabic and I know that allah is not Yasu. Have a good night, RWH.

          • RWH

            I doubt that you know what the word means. The Christian world does not agree with you as the word Allah has been the traditional word used to refer to God in the liturgy, which is recited daily throughout the Arabic world and in Arabic-speaking churches within the United States. The Orthodox Church is very, very particular about word usages, perhaps a little too much as Koinea Greek is still used in churches within Greece. You are certainly free to choose different words to suit your particular preferences, but your version of the Bible will not be recognized by the more traditional churches. So, if I have the choice to believe the theologians of the Church or you, I would rather believe them as they are most likely much better educated in the traditional languages than you.

          • waffleater

            its just a generic term meaning “god” get over it

          • Guest

            You’re obviously not an Arabic speaker. 🙂

          • Elie Challita

            I am a native Arabic speaker, and I can pretty much confirm that Allah is a contraction for Al Ilah, which can mean either The God or A God.
            I was raised a Maronite Christian in Lebanon, and attended Orthodox mass as well with my mother, and both denominations, as well as any other Arabic-speaking denomination in the region, use Allah constantly to refer to the Christian god.

            It’s nice to pontificate, but you should at least have an idea of what you’re talking about.

          • Guest

            Hi Elie, you and I had this conversation before. 🙂 Remember I referenced you to Arabbible? Didn’t you also convert to Islam?

          • Elie Challita

            Nope, I’ve been an atheist for years now. Why would I reject a bunch of superstitions to embrace another?

          • Guest

            You told me last time you’d converted to Islam.

          • Elie Challita

            You must have me confused with someone else.

          • waffleater

            you are obviously not reasonable

          • Guest

            Thanks for proving my point. 🙂

          • waffleater

            you think allah is a “moon god” despite it only being a discredited conspiracy theory

          • New Centurion

            Fortunately the “Church” doesn’t belong to the Greeks or the Russians, Serbs or any other ethnic group, it belongs to the Lord Jesus Christ. While the OCC claims to be the guardians of Christian truth, they don’t appear to want to tell anyone about it. I’m former Orthodox, it’s an ethnic club, more concerned with turf and protecting cultural traditions than preaching the gospel to the lost. Look at the mess in North America. Protestants don’t care if you’re “cradle” the gospel is for everyone. So before you start jamming on the “Johnny-come-latelys” you may want to remove that log from your own eye first.

        • Elie Challita

          Ilah is the singular noun for it, but Allah is a contraction of Al ilah which means “The God”, as in the one and only god. I was raised as a Christian in the middle east and we always used Allah in reference to god.

          • Guest

            In the new translations, we are not using allah. You can find more about it if you search for Arabbible.

          • Elie Challita

            Good for you. It doesn’t make it true, though.

          • Guest

            Of course it does. Lots of former Muslims are working on accurate Arab translations that remove the name “allah” from the Bible. Funny how that bothers you so much, you being an atheist and all.

          • Elie Challita

            Again, good for you and you can put whatever you want in that book of yours, but it doesn’t make it true.
            I’m bothered, frankly, because I’m a native Arabic speaker and you’re bastardizing the language. My still-Christian parents would laugh their heads off if you told them that they can’t refer to their god using the word Allah.

          • Guest

            The translation is being done by native Arabic speakers. 🙂 Many former Muslims who convert to Christianity will no longer say allah.

          • Elie Challita

            Again, good for them. What about the multitudes of Arab Christians who have been saying Allah for generations?

          • Guest

            Hopefully they will see that they have been deceived. Many Arabic Bibles also place Ishmael’s name in place of Isaac’s, something else that needs to be corrected.

          • Elie Challita

            Right. Good luck with that.

          • waffleater

            so do you also believe Obama is born in Kenya and that the moon landing was fake?

          • waffleater

            there is no “deception” because allah is just a generic term for god like tengri,bog, kami, shen etc…

          • waffleater

            the oldest Arabic bibles use Allah

          • Guest

            That doesn’t mean they are accurate. They also misidentify Isaac and Ishmael.

          • waffleater

            calling god God is inaccurate?

      • JodyLynn Harris

        It doesn’t matter. That’s what they call their “god” period. We call ours Jesus. It is not the same god. Allah is the pagan moon god. I have heard Muslims say God and not use Allah many times, so it IS the name in which they have given their God no matter how much the new age cult wishes to identify it. Regardless of your lack of understanding “saying The God” is giving your god a name! Our Holy God is named I Am. Its not like pagan gids were named Ted. “The God” is the same name new Ayers who worship the sun call their god – only they call it “the one.” so as you can see it IS still a name. To teach they are all the same god is just more hedonistic preaching. Those who are of God and not the devil know this. The devil has many fake religions and in each one they call him something else. Jesus is YAHWEH. Make no mistake. There is ONE GOD JESUS CHRIST. Whether you think it matters or not, by using Allah and not Jesus you have created an idol and your own god… It is not and never will be the creator. Allah is the old pagan moon God and he is the devil. You can try to link them all you want but one day you will find out how wrong you are.

        • acontraryview

          “Make no mistake. There is ONE GOD JESUS CHRIST. ”

          Basis?

          • hytre64

            I AM the Way, the Truth, and the Light, and No man comes to the Father but though Me. – Gospel of John

          • Danfire

            Light should be “Life”…if you’re referring to John 14:6 🙂

          • hytre64

            Thanks for the correction to my typo. Sometimes my fingers fly faster than my mind.

          • acontraryview

            Using the Bible as a proof source is like using Harry Potter as a proof source for magic.

          • hytre64

            Since I doubt you would even rely on the words of those healed from cancer (I know a couple), or one brought back from the dead (stillborn and declared dead by the attending physician, but now she is 30 years old), or of the miracles of lives changed, I will fall back on what those wiser than me have said; The Heavens declare the Glory of God, and the Firmament shows His handiwork. All of creation testifies to the Creator.

          • acontraryview

            I most certainly believe in miracles and God’s intervention in our lives. That, however, does not provide proof that Christianity is the only true word of God.

        • Josey

          amen and only God the Father can reveal this revelation which Jesus is building His church on, He is the Great I Am, Lord of Hosts, The Mighty God, Counselor, The Prince of Peace, Jesus, Jesus, Jesus, glory to His Holy Name!

        • waffleater

          muslims only started to use the moon as a symbol after the turks became muslim

        • waffleater

          because God and Allah mean the same thing and are interchange able I mean you don’t bother screaming like a wingnut when Turks call god Tengri when Japanese call God Kami or when Russians call god Bog

      • hytre64

        If this were true, then why does the Shahadah specifically state (in English), “There is no god but Allah?”. If “god” and “allah” were identical in Arabic, then the statement would be translated as “There is no god but god” or “There is no Allah but Allah”. Instead, Allah is used as the proper name of the god that muslims worship.

        • Ambulance Chaser

          Simple. It doesn’t. You can recite the shahadah “There is no god but God.” That’s a perfectly acceptable way to day it.

        • Elie Challita

          Because it’s an imperfect translation. Technically, the shahada should be recited in Arabic where it says “la ilaha illa Allah” which translates “There is no god but The God”.
          Whomever says There is no god but Allah is quite frankly giving up on the translation halfway through.

          • hytre64

            Let us not forget the second half of the Shahadah, “And Muhammad is his messenger”. This clearly identifies “Allah” (capitalized as a proper name in English, just as you capitalized “God”) as the deity for whom Muhammad was a prophet. Since Muhammad was not a prophet of the God of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Jesus, Allah is not the same as YHWH ( יהוה).

          • Elie Challita

            Actually, Muslims consider Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Jesus to be prophets of the same god as Muhammad’s. In fact, Muhammad is supposedly the last in a line of prophets beginning with Abraham.

          • hytre64

            Jesus, though, was not just a “prophet”. By His death, burial and resurrection, He was shown to be the Son of God with Power (Rom 1:4). Throughout the Gospels, Jesus’ divinity, and the exclusivity of His message was shown.

            I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.” John 14:6

            I am the light of the world. He who follows Me shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life. John 8:12

            “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die.” John 11:25-26

            I am the bread of life. He who comes to Me shall never hunger, and he who believes in Me shall never thirstJohn 6:35

          • Elie Challita

            Immaterial: That’s what you believe about the guy. Muslims believe he was a human prophet, albeit the most highly respected one after Muhammad.
            As far as I’m concerned you’re just pitting your book against theres, with very little evidence for any. At least we can tell that Muhammad actually existed from historical records.

          • hytre64

            Are you saying that the Gospels, the Epistles and Josephus are not “historical records”?

          • Elie Challita

            That’s exactly what I’m saying. They’re as historical as the Koran: There might be a kernel of truth in there, but they’re nowhere near enough to testify for everything that happened in them.

            Hell, we expect most historical records to be heavily biased, if not outright fabricated, unless we find independent corroborating evidence for them. Why do the Gospels get a free pass instead of the Egyptian Book of the Dead?

          • hytre64

            And Josephus?

          • Elie Challita

            Going by the quotes I’ve seen, Josephus does nothing to affirm the divinity of Jesus: If those segments are even true, they simply state that there existed a man called Jesus with a brother named James.
            Again, I’m not categorically denying the existence of a man who was at the kernel of Christianity, same as the historical Muhammad was at the root of the Koran. I am disputing, however, the whole Son of God belief sounds as plausible as Muhammad flying to the moon on a yellow flying donkey.

          • hytre64

            No, but Josephus *did* affirm the existence of Jesus as an historical figure. Josephus was not a Christian, but can be cited to rebut the non-existence (ie. non-historicity) of Jesus as an actual person.

            It seems that there is a double standard going here. If a document affirms Jesus as God’s Son, you dismiss it as non-historical. If the document doesn’t affirm Jesus as God’s Son, you then claim that even if it is valid, it doesn’t show Christ’s divinity. Ergo, no document would be capable of satisfying the criteria because you have decided a priori that such proof cannot exist.

          • Elie Challita

            I didn’t dispute the historicity of Jesus as an actual person, because I really don’t know whether some guy named Jesus actually existed, and preached much of what was later reported. Josephus’ mentions might very well be about that person. I’ll even give you a head start and accept that someone named Jesus did exist, did preach, and was crucified.

            That still doesn’t affirm his divinity: You’re right, I do not accept a text affirming his divinity any more than I take the Illiad as proof that Achilles’ mother was a goddess, or the Koran as proof that Muhammad flew to the moon. Writing’s easy, if you haven’t noticed, and religious texts are a dime a dozen. A religious text affirming divinity, by itself, is never proof because there are simply too many false positives for me to take any of them seriously.

            How about you go ahead and irrefutably prove that the world was created according to those texts? Or that an afterlife does exist? Or that an omniscient and omnipotent being actually exists, and that he considers shellfish to be an abomination?
            If you can scientifically prove those assertions, then you’d have a point. Until then, the Gospels affirm Jesus’ divinity as much as the Odyssey affirms Athena’s.

          • hytre64

            “At least we can tell that Muhammad actually existed from historical records.”

            This is your quote that I was referring to – namely that Josephus IS a historical record which records the existence of Jesus.

          • Elie Challita

            Alright, I’ll grant you that one. What about the rest?

    • acontraryview

      Or maybe the God of Islam is the true God and you have it wrong. it’s a matter of belief. That’s why they call it “faith” and not “fact”.

      • Gary W James

        Allah is a demonic cult.

        • acontraryview

          You are certainly entitled to your opinion.

      • Josey

        Matthew 16:13-20 13 When Jesus came into the coasts of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, saying, Whom do men say that I the Son of man am?
        14 And they said, Some say that thou art John the Baptist: some, Elias; and others, Jeremias, or one of the prophets. 15 He saith unto them, But whom say ye that I am? 16 And Simon Peter answered and said, Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God. 17 And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven.
        It is more than just faith, it is a revelation given to a person by Almighty God and once revealed to a person, no man, no devil in hell, no one can change the mind of the one God has revealed this to!

        • acontraryview

          “It is more than just faith, it is a revelation given to a person by Almighty God and once revealed to a person, no man, no devil in hell, no one can change the mind of the one God has revealed this to!”

          You are certainly free to believe that, but it remains just that – something you have chosen to believe in. It is a matter of faith.

          • John_33

            Well, no. It’s either true or it isn’t. It’s not just about blindly believing in something. There’s truth involved.

  • bowie1

    Although some Christian women wear a head scarf (appealing to some New Testament passages) it is still the “job” of Christians to share the gospel with others.

  • JodyLynn Harris

    And many false gospels and false Christs will enter the world…. And they all worshiped the beast…. We knew there would be tares… Even in the “church.”

  • robertzaccour

    Oh yeah, wear a bird keeper suit like the muslim women that are literally slaves, that’ll make you look different from the harsh reality they live. Not.

  • acontraryview

    Good for her! She certainly seems to be walking the path that Jesus taught.

    • hytre64

      If so, then why is she not reaching them with the Gospel that Jesus preached?

      Jesus didn’t preach, “Feel good about yourselves and keep doing whatever it is that you are doing.” John (Jesus’ forerunner) preached, “Repent for the Kingdom of Heaven is at hand” Jesus, himself, rebuked the religious elders, the money changers, those who would have (illegally) stoned a woman, and told those whom He met to stop sinning.

  • Bacchus

    Stupid ignorant woman. The book of Apocalypses (Revelation) names allah as the beast SATAN. She needs to bring them the Gospel of SALVATION OF JESUS CHRIST NOT SIDE WITH THE DEVIL.

  • Bezukhov

    I have a question for all the Hardcore Christians around here. It’s been bugging me for a while. If you have two prisoners, one a Muslim, the other a Homosexual, but only one bullet, who would Jesus want shot with that final round?

    • Josey

      I will answer this with Jesus own words in John 10:10 “The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.”

    • Carlos M

      That’s snarky and stupid.

    • hytre64

      He would want the Gospel preached to both of them, that they might repent and have Eternal Life.

  • archaeologist

    american christian women are just dumb.

  • DLCraig

    The visible Christian Church in America is an impotent stew of scrambled beliefs based on how one (like this woman) “feels” about any given subject. Her local church has obviously failed her in teaching both doctrine and application. She (like so many) has been allowed to create a made to order gospel for herself that resembles nothing remotely Christian.

    • Carlos M

      Regrettably, the majority of American Christians are ignorant of the Bible and of basic Christians belief. They’ve followed their secular buddies in the belief that “being Christians” means “being nice.” Christianity in this country is about 3000 miles way and a quarter-inch deep.

  • Seniorsquadldr

    I Challenge Ms. Hijab to pack her suitcase full of bibles. Pack up her family. Take the bibles and family to mecca. Ms. Hijab can open a ministry and church there. Since Ms. Hijab believes there is no difference between Christians and Muslims she will be welcomed with open arms.

  • hytre64

    If your job is to love your neighbor, you would not allow them to go to Hell without trying to let them know the truth. If wearing the Hajib would enable you to witness better to your Muslim neighbors, I say go for it! If, on the other hand, you do this so that they feel nice and comfy as they go through this life and let them assume that you are OK with them not having Jesus as Lord and Savior and are fine with them going to eternal damnation, then the Bible says that their blood will be on your hands.

    Being a Muslim is not “an alternative” way to God – There is but One Way and His name is Jesus.

  • LilySmith

    You either believe and follow Jesus Christ as the one who speaks for God, or you follow Muhammad. You cannot follow both because their teachings are contradictory. Muhammad’s teachings reject Jesus as the Son of God. If you follow Muhammad, you reject Jesus. Anyone who rejects Jesus as the Son of God is not a Christian.

    It always amazes me to see a Western woman put on a head scarf with skinny jeans and tank tops in solidarity with Islam. Seriously?

  • Steven

    “And as Pope Francis stated last week, we worship the same God.”

    Umm…no…no we (Christians) don’t. Here’s some really simple logic.

    Nike and Ben & Jerry’s are businesses (notice the term business is used for both). One sells shoes, the other sells ice cream. Now! I’m not going to look for tennis shoes at Ben & Jerry’s and I’m not going to look for ice cream at Nike. Just as I’m not going to look for salvation in Islam, as a Christian.

    Anyone trying to accommodate the notion that they (Christianity/Islam) worship the same god hasn’t even left the preschool of Bible and Quranic studies.

    • Quantz

      Sorry, but WHAT?

      Nike sells shoes.
      Ben & Jerry’s sells ice cream.

      Allah “sells” God.
      Christianity also “sells” God, so your analogy falls flat. And of course Islam promises salvation, exactly the same as Christianity does. They just go about it differently.

      • Steven

        Why don’t you go back and read slower. Apparently, you’re either doing two things at the same time or reading faster than your brain can process. It’s not difficult. It appears as if you read a couple words incorrectly.

        If you still don’t understand after reading it again, No problem, I just keep expecting more intellect out of this generation. My bad.

        • Quantz

          Sorry to tell you, but your message read exactly the same no matter what speed I read it. It’s the whole Christian supremacist thing over and over with you guys. Can’t just call Islam a different faith, you have to point out what’s “wrong” with it. As though they can’t do the same thing to you.

          Christians call their god God. Or Jesus, or Yeshua, or ten million variants of that.
          Muslims call their god Allah. It’s the same God. You know, creator of the world, watcher over us all, the one we hopefully go to when we die in hope of salvation, etc? Ring a bell?

          Also, what “generation” am I, then? You just instinctively know?

          • Steven

            “It’s the same God”

            No! Not the same.

            Ben & Jerry’s = ice cream
            Nike = Tennis Shoes
            Both = business

            Islam’s god = mono / one / no son / no holy spirit
            Christianity’s God = Triune God; Father, Son and Holy Spirit
            Both = God (actually, Islam = god, little ‘g’)

            Can’t just call Islam a different faith

            I can call it a different faith, no problem. It’s just the wrong one. A work based faith.

      • Steven

        Oh!! Islam promises salvation?

        Think again. Islam is a works based religion, and being such, there is no certainty your works will be acceptable to Allah (Islam’s god).

        “By Allah! I would not rest assured and feel safe from the deception of Allah, even if I had one foot in paradise.” Abu Bakr

        • Quantz

          Yeah, so what? Catholics also believe in a combination of works and grace through faith. Are you going to tell me they aren’t part of your elite club too?

          IT’S THE SAME EXACT GOD. You just have different ideas about Him.

        • Elie Challita

          The majority of Christianity outside of Protestantism, also stresses salvation by deeds. Feel free to define your own little club as the One True Christianity (TM), but that doesn’t make it trye.

          • Steven

            The majority…/… little club

            I like your wording.

            Matthew 7:13-14
            Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.

            The majority of Christianity outside of Protestantism, also stresses salvation by deeds.

            There’s a huge flaw in your statement. It’s not supported by scripture. Anyone, postulating that works are required would be stating that Jesus’ sacrifice was insufficient.

            If I’m not mistaken, I think the pope admitted to such. Hmm…Is he following Christian doctrine?

            Not everyone that says Lord, Lord…(Mat 7:21)

          • Elie Challita

            I’m making no judgment as to the validity of that belief. I don’t share any of it, so y’all can argue to your heart’s content.
            I’m just pointing out that you define Islam as distinct from Christianity because it depends on good deeds, but if I haven’t forgotten my Catholic upbringing good deeds were very much a requirement for us as well.

          • Steven

            Catholic upbringing good deeds were very much a requirement for us as well.

            You are absolutely correct.

            define Islam as distinct from Christianity because…

            That’s not the only premise. I believe I made another comment mentioning the difference in how Islam defines god and how Christianity defines God.

          • Elie Challita

            ” Islam promises salvation?
            Think again. Islam is a works based religion, and being such, there is no certainty your works will be acceptable to Allah”

            That’s the one I was referring to. For all you know, the Christian god is just as unreliable. For all you know, He/She/It doesn’t even accept your idea of salvation by faith, however you define it.

  • http://intensedebate.com/people/CgntvDssdnt CgntvDssdnt

    We are all human beings.

  • George Jenkins

    “I said I’m trying to walk in someone else’s shoes,” DeVries said. Well, she should be trying to walk in Jesus’ shoes…………not Mohammed’s

  • Mark Johnston

    bullshit Lady!???

  • Mark Johnston

    why dont u wear a bible around ur neck to show solidarity to the Lord jesus Christ??? It will get u alot further than throwing ur pearls to Swine

  • Church Politics

    She shouldnt mind if we judge her as non-Christian, as she defends this bankrupt religion over Christianity