Teen Forced to Have Sex With 1,000 Men Sues Motel Where Human Trafficking Took Place

PHILADELPHIA — A Philadelphia teenager who says she was forced to have sex with an estimated 1,000 men over a period of two years has sued the motel where the abuse took place, alleging that they knew she was being held against her will.

“She is devastated by what happened to her. She’s just trying to piece her life back together,” attorney Nadeem Bezar told reporters this week. “She’s getting the therapy she needs, but her life will never be the same.”

The now 17-year-old girl, who is only being identified by the initials M.B, was only 14 when she found herself on the streets on-and-off. After hooking up with the “wrong crowd,” her attorneys state, she was forced into the sex trafficking industry.

The teen was allegedly held at Roosevelt Inn by her captors, sometimes months at a time, and was not allowed to leave. She was instead forced to have sex with men “double, triple and quadruple her age.”

Inn Manager Yagna Patel says that he was unaware that any such activity was taking place.

“We just rent the room and that’s all we can do,” he told the Philadelphia Inquirer. “If we think a lot of people are having a party in the room, we kick them out.”

But the girl’s attorneys believe that it would have been impossible for staff not to notice the large numbers of men coming to the room, as well as other signs of illicit activity.

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“You have to be blind, deaf and dumb not to know that 100 men are showing up over a period of a couple days,” attorney Tom Kline stated.

The lawsuit states that the teen’s traffickers “consistently displayed ‘do not disturb’ signs on the door to the motel … and consistently refused housekeeping services.” The girl also “dressed in a sexually explicit manner and would walk the hallways of the Roosevelt Inn.”

Assistant District Attorney Erin O’Brien told reporters that previous cases of trafficking and prostitution have pointed back to those renting rooms at the inn.

“Almost every trafficking investigation we have, we see the victim is at Roosevelt Inn,” she said. “I know our vice officers are out there on a regular basis.”

The girl was able to eventually escape and has now reconnected with her family. Her captors were convicted and sentenced to prison.

The suit seeks $50,000 in damages based on the Pennsylvania Human Trafficking Law, passed in 2014, which made it illegal to harbor a minor for sex trafficking purposes.

“As a result of Defendants’ negligence, defendants financially profited from the human sex trafficking and continued to profit by not reporting, intervening, disrupting or otherwise stopping the practice,” the legal complaint reads. “Defendants acted outrageously and in reckless disregard for the health and welfare of the minor Plaintiff, warranting the imposition of punitive damages.”

“Jury verdicts will resonate with owners and operator of motel and hotels,” Kline said. “There is no doubt that this is more commonplace than any of us would like to believe. This is an open, obvious, notorious case. But we also believe it occurs in fancy hotels in Center City, and occurs in casinos in our midst, and it occurs in shacks that are motels along the roadside. This is where the purveyors of sex traffic do their business.”


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  • RWH

    If this girl was walking the hallways in an explicit manner as she describes, why didn’t she approach the desk clerk and let him/her know of her situation? The clerk could have easily stashed her away in a secure place until the police arrived, which should have been quite quickly.

    • Chet

      Why did she say nothing to the clerk, could it be she was but a child, scared to death for disobedience… Rather, why were the police not called when a very underage youth walked about in public in overly revealing attire…Alarms and bells should’ve sounded. Let’s see how this case pans out.

      • RWH

        There’s way too many questionable things going on here that the attorney for the hotel should have a field day in court. For example, where were the child’s parents when she was wandering the streets. Why didn’t they contact the police? Why didn’t the girl contact the authorities? She was certainly old enough. If she had the freedom to wander around the hotel, why didn’t she try to leave? Lots of people wander around a hotel not fully dressed, especially if there is an exercise room or a pool. Whatever the case, if she didn’t try to get some sort of help when she was there, it sure looks like she’s looking for a way to make a fast buck. My hunch is that the girl is going to lose. However, there’s too many missing details to determine for certainty.

        • Chet

          Well, we’ll have to wait and see. Thanks for the exchange of views.

  • Grace Kim Kwon

    May God heal the girl. It seems everyone in this story is greedy after something. And this incident must be a tip of an iceburg. Every hotel’s check-in counters should be checked or monitored by the police. And for the children and youth, the accompanying guardians’ IDs must be presented as well. Make hotels’ check-in like that of airports.

    • RWH

      Sorry, Grace. We don’t run a police state here. Our Constitution protects us against unreasonable searches. Unless the police can produce a search warrant, hotel books are off limits, and so are those at airports. Most likely in this case, the girl was sneaked in by the back door, so hotel management was probably not even aware of what was going on.

      • Grace Kim Kwon

        That’s sad. Americans and visitors let agents touch all over their body in airports; why can’t police monitor hotels’ check-ins and hallways? Isn’t it a double standard? The life of children and the slaves is far more important than some people’s desire of secrecy; hotels should be checked like airports are now we have too many criminals and victims in the land.

        • RWH

          There’s two types of law. Inquisitor-y Law states that a person is guilty and has to prove his/her innocence. The other type of law is what we have in the United States. A person is presumed innocent until proven guilty. We also have strict laws against illegal search and seizure. If hotel management suspected anything, they could have called the police, but the police would have had to get a search warrant from the court. We as Americans are not interested in any form of totalitarian government. Police cannot enter our homes at will, and they cannot enter hotel rooms or make arrests without good cause. Many cases have been thrown out of court because the police took it upon themselves to read a person his/her rights under the law or to search an individual’s possessions without a court order.

          If we were to do what you desire, we would have to switch to Inquisitor-y Law.

          • Grace Kim Kwon

            Hotel counters and hallways should not be made private like the airport’s interior isn’t. Nations must change to protect more youth.

          • RWH

            There’s already too much surveillance. Cameras are all over the place. Fortunately, restrictions are in place that govern their use. We’re not interested in a police state where Big Brother is watching our every move. I should be able to book a room in a hotel without my reservation being recorded by some sort of secret police. We’ll save that for Nazi Germany.

          • Grace Kim Kwon

            Children’s safety and the victims’ rescue is the first priority. The government has all the records anyway. It should be made easier to liberate people.

          • RWH

            I’m not sure what you mean by records. A business may have security cameras, but police just can’t come in and demand to see the tape. They must get a court order. Criminals still have constitutional rights because people here are presumed innocent until proven guilty. We would have to change our fundamental criminal law for this to change, and that would cause a huge shock wave to our entire constitutional system.

          • Grace Kim Kwon

            The records are there. Yes, something must change foundationally. It’s time, since men no longer care to protect women and children. A society is civilized with good intention only when the people have Judeo-Christian values. US police needs Christianity for them to conduct justice to all.

          • RWH

            Grace. It’s not going to happen. Period. We don’t want a state church. We don’t want some high, exalted potentate of a religious leader butting into our personal lives. You can lament all you want about American society, what goes on in Texas, and anything else. We’re very capable of running our on affairs without do-good-er outsiders telling us how we should behave.

            It is obvious that you would not like it here in America because we’re not interested in your lofty standards and your supposed golden-age when the Church ran things. For good or for bad, we live in a pluralistic society ruled by a democracy. The days are gone when white males ruled, and women and minorities knew how to keep their mouths shut and obey. For the most part, we have learned to put our differences aside and to work collectively. We have never had the violent revolutions that Europe has experienced, with its strong-arm governments and its state churches–which brutally suppressed others until the others got strong enough to fight back with a vengeance.

            You’re like a nosy neighbor who gossips about how she could raise our kids better. All this type does is label themselves as someone to be avoided at all costs.

          • Chet

            Whether invited or no and whether one cares or no, God Almighty sets the standard and it is Him, with whom we all have to do someday… And such is no state church, God is Supreme, church approved or sanctioned, unsanctioned or otherwise…

          • RWH

            The problem is that someone needs to interpret that standard for the rest of us. There are a number of religious authorities that want to set the absolute standard. Who will it be? Pope Francis? The President of the Southern Baptist Convention? Patriarch Kirril of the Russian Orthodox Church? Otherwise, your interpretation of that standard is about as valid as is mine. Years ago, I was at a Baptist Convention where a person got up and lamented that her pastor was not being listened to as he was the Anointed of God. She even got more upset when someone else got up on the floor and informed her that her pastor was also the Anointed of God and thought that the other pastor should be listening to her pastor. This is why some people feel more secure with a strong-arm government. They control truth, they control what is right and wrong, and they control the dissemination of opinions, and the naysayers are quickly dealt with before they can cause harm. This type of control goes by many names: among them are the Communists, the Flange, and the Nazis.

          • Chet

            Those two people elevating their respective pastors are seriously, if not indeed gravely, in error. Some thought the same of Jim Jones . Pastor or no, the man behind the pulpit, any pulpit, anywhere is a sinner, same as all those sitting in the pews. The only one worthy of all glory, honor, praise, and fear is the Lord Jesus Christ of Calvary and He has already decreed what thus saith the Lord in His Word, the Holy Bible. When one takes his directives for living and ultimately, dying, straight from the one and only redeemer, one can n ever go wrong. This is Holy Spirit control, not of wicked men. Remember, the best of men is at best a sinner same as you and me…

          • Chet

            And garner a God inspired serving law to protect innocents…

      • Chet

        Strongly disagree. Such would indeed have been a very reasonable search and there’s nothing but self serving interests and a couldn’t care less attitude at work here…

        • RWH

          The problem is that if the police were called, they would have to have some very convincing evidence with which they could take to a judge. Hotel management might be able to enter a room if they had good cause, but police cannot without that warrant. Otherwise, all evidence would be thrown out of court, and the perpetrators would go free. Too many cases have been lost because law enforcement did not do things by the book.

          • Chet

            According to this article the hostage taking perpetrators have already gone free. For the sake of a minor, I think I’d err on the side of saving and delivering such a one as her… And deal with the fallout later…

          • RWH

            In other words, the perpetrators had some very smart lawyers, or the case against them wasn’t a very good one. There are too many fishy details in the mix. However, the police just can’t barge in without a warrant. There just aren’t enough facts presented here to do independent research into the matter. When I lived in Kansas back in the early 90s, I had the opportunity to work with the Kansas Highway Patrol and some local police stations. I learned a number of things that were somewhat surprising and enlightening as to how hands were tied. Get out of line and poke your nose where it is not wanted, and budgets would be cut and old equipment wouldn’t be replaced. Looking the other way sometimes meant that the local fire department would get a new truck or a new ambulance.

          • Chet

            I am familiar with the crookedness of which you refer… Things are that way because this nation has turned her back on God Almighty. The wicked shall be turned into Hell and all the nations that forget God. Thanks for the exchange of views.

          • christiannewsnetwork

            Hi Chet, the article states, “Her captors were convicted and sentenced to prison.” They are not free.

  • Allan Brewster

    Government is spying on everyone in America through NSA. Why not this too. Hotels could be a hot spot for terrorists.

    • RWH

      I’m sure that hotels are used for lots of things beside sleeping. However, if you suspect some foul play, you had better come to the police with some concrete proof before they’re going to act. Police know the rules, and they know that they must follow the rules, or their evidence will be tossed by the courts. They know that they need solid evidence before they can go before a judge and to get a court warrant to conduct a search.

      • Allan Brewster

        NSA taps every phone call.

  • Chet

    $50k is entirely too little for this cruel and inhuman treatment and atmosphere’s turning a blind eye to the matter. It should be more like $500,000. as a minimum for what she had to go through with the sleaze and utter disgusting filth of it all.